(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Fayetteville State Teachers College Catalog"

FSU ARCHIVES 




— THE 



FAYETTE VI LLE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 




CATALOG 

1950-1951 



WUk Announcement*. Qo*i 195i-1952 



SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



THE FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS 

COLLEGE 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

FOUNDED 1877 

The Oldest Teacher Training Institution Established in 
North Carolina for Any Race 




A STANDARD STATE-ACCREDITED FOUR-YEAR 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

With Courses Leading to the Bachelor's Degree in Education 
and the Class A Certificate 

Accredited in Class A by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools 



SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

1950-1951 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1951-1952 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/fayettevillestat19501951 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

CALENDAR AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 6 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 7 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 7 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Administration 8 

Instruction 8 

N. C. Newbold Laboratory School 10 

Other Officers 11 

COMMITTEES 12 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Statement 13 

Aims of the College 15 

Buildings and Grounds 15 

Who Should Attend 17 

Reasons for Attending Fayetteville State Teachers College 17 

Self-Help Opportunities 18 

What to Bring 18 

Textbooks '. 18 

STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

General Statement 18 

Religious Activities 19 

Social Activities - — ___ - 19 

Athletic Activities 19 

Student Organizations - 20 

Musical Organizations 22 

Lyceum Attractions - - - - — 22 

Alumni Association 22 

SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Fees and Expenses 23 

Refunds 24 

, Information for Parents - - 24 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

Admission as a Freshman 25 

Admission as a Special Student - - - - 25 

Admission to Advanced Standing 25 

Registration - - - - - 26 

Change of Registration 26 

Normal Load - - - - 26 

Comprehensive Examination 26 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Grading System 26 

Credits 27 

Quality Points - - - 27 

Classification of Students 27 

Scholastic Probation 2"7 

Dean's List - 28 

Attendance 28 

Group Advisers 28 

Examinations 29 

Junior College Offerings 29 



Table of Contents — Continued 

Page 

Student Teaching Requirements 29 

Graduation Requirements - — - — — - — 30 

Diploma and Certificate 31 

Commencement 31 

Prizes and Awards - - - - 31 

CURRICULA 33 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Education and Psychology 36 

English Language and Literature 38 

Fine Arts 

I. Music 39 

II. Art 40 

Practical Arts 

I. Household Arts 40 

II. Industrial Arts 41 

Social Science 41 

Science and Mathematics 

Natural Science 43 

Mathematics 43 

Health and Physical Education 43 

Minor in Physical Education - 45 

Health and Physical Education Requirements for Minors 

and All Students 45 

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOLS 46 

SUMMER SCHOOL AND EXTENSION 46 

The Summer School 

Who May Attend 47 

Fees and Expenses 47 

Refunds 48 

Important Notice - 48 

General Information 48 

Residence and Conduct 48 

Courses and Subjects 48 

Special Information for Students Seeking Certification or Degrees 
Wholly or Partly Through Summer School and Extension 
Certification Regulations Applying to In-Service 

Training of Teachers 49 

Degree Requirements for Persons Who Have Done 
no Residence Work in the Regular School Ses- 
sion and Hence are not Normal School Graduates 49 

Degree Requirements for Two-Year Standard Nor- 
mal School Graduates 50 

WILMINGTON COLLEGE CENTER 52 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 52 

ENROLLMENT 

1950 Graduates — Bachelor of Science Degree 53 

Register of Students 1949-50 54 

Summer School 1950 60 

Off-Campus College Center, Wilmington, N. C 63 

Extension Center, Fort Bragg 63 

Geographical Distribution of Students 64 

Summary of Enrollment 1950-1951 66 



CALENDAR FOR 1951 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


1 

7 8 

14 15 

21 22 

28 29 


2 3 4 

9 10 11 

16 17 18 

23 24 25 

30 31 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


1 

8 

15 

22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 

14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 

24 25 26 
31 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 

27 28 


7 
14 
21 
28 


12 3 4 5 6 

8 9 10 11 12 13 

15 16 17 18 19 20 

22 23 24 25 26 27 

29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


1 

6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 
17 

24 


6 

13 

20 
27 


r 

14 
21 

28 


12 3 
8 9 10 

15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


5 

12 

19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


1 2 

7 8 9 

14 15 16 

21 22 23 

28 29 30 


3 4 
10 11 
17 18 
24 25 
31 


4 

11 
18 
25 


12 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


1 

6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24 
31 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 

11 

18 
25 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


1 
8 

13 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


2 
9 

16 
23 

30 


3 

10 
17 

24 


4 5 6 
11 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 

28 29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


1 

3 4 5 6 7 8 
10 11 12 13 14 15 
17 18 19 20 21 22 

24 25 26 27 28 29 
31 



CALENDAR FOR 1952 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F 


S 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






12 3 


4 


5 






12 3 


4 


■5 




1 2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


5 


6 7 8 9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


12 


13 14 15 16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 21 22 23 


?A 




27 


28 


29 30 31 






27 


28 


29 30 






27 


28 


29 30 31 






26 


27 2S 29 30 


31 




FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F 


S 








1 


2 






1 


2 


g 








1 


2 








1 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


2 


3 4 5 6 


7 


8 


111 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 


oo 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


24 

31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


23 

30 


24 25 26 27 


28 


29 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F 


S 










1 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




12 3 4 




6 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


V 


8 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


13 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


lb 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


?,0 


16 


1Y 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


21 


22 23 24 25 


Kfi 




23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


29 


30 








28 


29 


30 






38 


29 30 31 






30 


31 





































CALENDAR AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1951 

June 5 Tuesday, Commencement Exercises, Awarding of Degrees. 

June 11 Monday, Summer Session begins. 

July 18 Tuesday, Summer Session ends. 

September 11 Tuesday, Freshmen enter 8:30 A.M. 

September 13 Thursday, Classes Begin 8:30 A.M. Fall Quarter Begins. 

October 9 Tuesday, Second School Month begins. 

November 6 Tuesday, Third School Month begins. 

November 22. Thursday, Thanksgiving Day (Holiday) 

December 4 Tuesday, End of Fall Quarter. 

December 5 Wednesday, Winter Quarter begins (Fourth School Month). 

December 20 Thursday, Christmas Holidays begin, 1:00 P.M. 

1952 

January 3. ..Thursday, Christmas Holidays end. Classes resume at 8:30 

A. M. 

January 14 Monday, Fifth School Month begins. 

February 11 Monday, Sixth School Month begins. 

March 11 Tuesday, Second Quarter ends. 

March 12 Wednesday, Third Quarter begins. Seventh School Month. 

April 9. ..Wednesday, Eighth School Month begins. 

May 7 Wednesday, Ninth School Month begins. 

June 3 Tuesday, Commencement Exercises, Awarding of Degrees. 



* Monthly fees are due and payable in advance at the beginning of each 
school month. 

# For the Summer of 1951 there will be only one six weeks session of 
Summer School. 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



H. P. TAYLOR, Lieutenant-Governor Chairman 

BRANDON P. HODGES State Treasurer 

CLYDE A. ERWIN, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Secretary 



G H. FERGUSON, Director, Division of Negro Education 

S. E. DUNCAN, Supervisor, Negro High Schools 

HVi (^VtVt- "TiTsS^mNH^LAWRENCE WOODSON, 

Supervisor, Negro Elementary Schools 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



"JOHN H. COOK, Chairman Fayetteville ^ 

u-M. E. BIZZELL Goldsboro. 

B. G. BULLOCK _. .. Autryville ^ 

C. W. FURLONGE Smithfield-" 

' C. F. HEDRICK, Secretary Fayetteville- 

" W. E. HORNER __Sanf ord 

iAQUILA MOORE Clarkton 

M. N. MULDROW- _ ...Whiteville 

M. P. POWELL _ Clinton - 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
AND INSTRUCTION 

1951-52 



ADMINISTRATION 
J. Ward Seabrook . President 

A.B., Ped.D., Johnson C. Smith University; A.M., Columbia University; further study: 
Columbia University, University of Chicago, New York University. 

Joseph H. Douglass ... Dean 

A.B., M.A., Fisk University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Arthur J. Pindle__ ' Business Manager 

B.S. in Business Administration, Hampton Institute. 

Henry M. L. James .-.Librarian 

B.Th., Virginia Union University; B.S. in Library Science, Hampton Institute; further 
study: Western Reserve University, to ©rs£o *]*— "** ' 

Lenna M. MEANS—-- Registrar 

B.S., South Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



INSTRUCTION 



Allen H. Brown, Chairman, Area of Science Chemistry 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Clarence A. Chick Economics 

A.B., Benedict College; M.A., Columbia University; further study: American Uni- 
versity, Columbia University. lie uj> t^of\£ (.' ''-,,-> 

Helen T. Chick Art 

B-S., M.S., Virginia State College; further study: Columbia University. 

James B. Coppage Manual Arts 

B.S., Mechanic Arts; B.S., Industrial Arts; M.S., Industrial Arts Education, Agricul- 
tural and Technical College. 

Lorena ^. Ce-ppAGE.j = _ill_:i_!li Education — Psychology' 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Susie S. Davis : Education 

B.S., Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College; M.A., Columbia University; 
further study : Catholic University. 

Joseph H. Douglass r Social Science — Education 

A.B., M.A., Fisk University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Florence P. Eaton Art 

B.S., A.M., New York University; Diploma, Snow Froelich Industrial Art School, Chi- 
cago ; Diploma, International Guild Crafters, Columbus, Ohio ; further study : Universal 
School of Crafts, New York City ; International School of Art at the University of 
Mexico and at Guadalajara, Mexico. : , . i i 

Henry M. Eldridge Mathematics — Physical Science 

B.S., Alabama State College; M.A., Columbia University. 
Marguerite S. Frierson, Chairman, Area of Education Education 

A.B., Shaw University; B.Ed., University of Cincinnati; M.Ed., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



\ 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 9 

William A. Gaines, Chairman, Area of Health and Physical 

Education Coach — Physical Education 

B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; M.A., Columbia University. 

- ' / 

J^feuL^-JfiEB'ERSON-v:., i /- Household Arts 

B.S., M.S., Virginia State College. 

Beulah W. Jones - r -Home Economics 

B.S., Shaw University; further study: Columbia University) North Carolina College 
at Durham. 

Werner L. Jordan .—.. -Physical Science 

A.B., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 

E. Louise Murphy History 

A.B., M.A., Howard University; further study: New York University. 

Mildred W. Newton_--_--'-' ...flofflS' 'Economics — English 

A.B., Talladega College; further study: Fisk University. 

John W. Parker, Chairman, Area of English English 

A.B., Shaw University; Ph.B., University of Chicago: A.M., Columbia University: 
further study : University of Chicago, Ohio State University. 

Lafayette Parker Mathematics — Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University; further study: 
Columbia University, New York University, Temple University; (_(_, .. . «- I ? ■ -VY* Va v 

Leonard H.-Rqbinson, Chairman, Area of Social Sciences Social Science 

B.S., Wilberforce University; A.M., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Andrew L. Scott Geography 

A.B., Morehouse College; M.A., Columbia University; further study: New York Uni- 
versity, Columbia University. 

Harold L. Scott Assistant Coach — Physical Education 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; further study: 
University of Pittsburgh. 

— JogN"Br*SL' oiT ~ -.-...Biology ( w\ v '" 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., Columbia University. . *** • • 

Minetta H. Scott English 

B.S., Shippensburg State Teachers College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; further 
study : University of Pittsburgh. 

Mae H. Seabrook_____ _____ Biology 

B.S., Howard University; Ed.M., Harvard University; further study: University of 
Rochester. 

♦Howard S. Smith Education — Psychology 

B.S., Howard University; Ed.M., Rutgers University; further study: Rutgers University. 

Nannie T. Smith English 

A.B., Howard University; M.A., Columbia University; further study: University of 
Chicago. 

Olivia T. Spaulding History — Part-time Counselor of Women 

A.B., Talladega College; M.R.E., Andover Newton Theological School; "LuuSkt^^ itLd,., .' <$»**** 

Lauretta J. Taylor Physical Education 

B.S., Agricultural and Technical College; M.A., Columbia University; further study: 
Columbia University, Yale University. 

Mary E. Terry, Chairman, Area of Fine Arts and Music Music 

Mus.B., Oberlin College; A.B., M.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology; further study: 
University of Pittoburgfa t ^*?,^Vsteu.<-z ■- f*Vus > c *_c T *si. V<*"Vc— 



*0n leave 1950-51. 



10 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
I Lois P. Turner — --English 

A.B., Shaw University; A.M., University of Pennsylvania; further study: Columbia 
University. 

Sylvia E. Walcott ^..^.... Music 

B.S.M., Howard University; fuiibw^tntlys Columbia University. 
/ 

•(■•Joseph A. Walker .: ____„_.,..•: < ...History — Assistant Coach 

A.B., M.A., Fisk University. 

Daniel A. Williams Health — Physical Education 

A.B., Agricultural arid Technical College; M. S. in Public Health, North Carolina 
CoUcge at Durham, _____ . { £, 

NEWBOLD LABORATORY SCHOOL 
Helen A. Hucles Principal — Supervisor of Student Teaching k 

B.S., Virginia Union University; M.S., University of Michigan; further study: Univer- 
sity of Southern California. / M . / -, 3 

Thelma B. Avent ..Supervising Teacher, Grade 5 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University; further study: 
Columbia University. 

Eleanor M. Birdsall Supervising Teacher, Grade 2 ' 

A.B., Shaw University; M.A., Columbia University; further study: New York University. _^ 

JO (t ' 

Teresa M. Callendar Supervising Teacher, Grade Jr 1 

B.S., M.S., Virginia State College; further study: Columbia University. -y / / - 

Juanita E. Coley Supervising Teacher, Grade k'tr 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

Katie V. Freeman Supervising Teacher, Grade h'*^ 

, . B.S., Cheyney State Teachers College: M.A., Columbia University.! ' ! * ^ "■ r 

Vivian S. Haithman Supervising Teacher, Grade S ^ 

B.S., M.A., Hampton Institute. o 

Cecil L. Hickerson Supervising Teacher, Grades 2 dn^S << 

A.B., Clark College; M.A., Hampton Institute, -fu <4W- eW^'.^^c-, J^^'i C^osA-ci U«.J, 

Orlando F. Hudson ....L '. . Supervising Teacher, Grade 8^ 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., Atlanta University; further study: 
New York University. 

Amy McM. Jeralds Supervising Teacher, Grade 2'" 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.S., Columbia University ,• U- ''"" i r '-^ 1 ■ ^ 

Mae F. Lindsey Supervising Teacher, Grade 1 ~ $ 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College ; further study : North Carolina College at 
Durham. 

Mildred F. Miller Supervising Teacher, Grade i^V" 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College: M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Ethel V. McIver ..Supervising Teacher, Grade 5,5^ 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania: -i " 'A' 1 - *** , ji ' 

Robbie H. Roper.-.. Supervising Teacher, Grade % y 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University. "i 

Catherine L. Smith .Supervising Teacher, Grade 1 *-7 

B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College; further study: University of Pennsylvania^*..- jiu.s 

Rora B. Smith ..Supervising Teacher, Grade 7 1/ 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; tt^y^- 
tDeceased March 7, 1951. 



6- 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 11 

Ibene D. Spaulding Supervising Teacher, Grade S V — 

B.S., M.A., Hampton Institute ' %tj-^Ct-c-^ /J*-^ '. \J v*^**—' 

Ltjla S. Summerville '. Supervising Teacher, Grade G"\**-" 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Columbia University; further study: Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

-' , ■'■ 



OTHER OFFICERS 

Selena W. Ashe Directress, Joyner Hall 

Winston-Salem Teachers College ; Columbia University. 

Ebbie J. Dobsey 1 Clerk-Typist 

A.B., Clark College; further study: Atlanta University. 

Katherine W. Douglass -Assistant Librarian 

Fisk University. 

Alice C. Evans _ _ Clerk-Typist 

New York University. 

Willie M. Gannaway Directress, Bickett Hall 

Barber Memorial Seminary. 

Lila C. Harper Z- , Bookkeeper, Business Office 

B.S.C., North Carolina College at Durham. 

TjTTiA S. Haywood Resident Nurse 

R.N., St. Agnes Hospital, Raleigh, N. C. 

Bbonetta H. James Assistant Librarian 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College. 

Mildred S. Johnson Assistant Budget Officer 

Certificate, Metropolitan School of Business. Los Angeles, California ; Certificate, South- 
western University. 

/I 

--THEfeiLA..G 1 . JIcDA-NiF.L-s^:i . :__.______ Clerk, Records Office 

B.S.C., North Carolina College at Durham. 

Ethel L. Taylor-.^ -... Secretary to President 

B.S.C., North Carolina College at Durham. 

Pauline J. Thomas _._.. Matron 

Philander Smith College; bVo.We> *v-*v. 

Hattie D. Whyte Directress, Harris Hall 

Shaw University ; Pratt Institute ; Hampton Institute. 

Mamie Wilkebson Assistant Librarian 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; B.S., Library Science, North Carolina College 
at Durham; further study: North Carolina College at Durham. 




COMMITTEES 



Alumni Relations — Nannie T. Smith, Chairman; Thelma B. Avent, Orlando 
F. Hudson, Robbie H. Roper, Rora B. Smith. 

Athletics — James E. Coppage, Chairman ; Allen H. Brown, William A. Gaines, 
Lenna M. Means, Lafayette Parker, Arthur J. Pindle, Leonard H. Rob- 
inson, Harold S. Scott, Lauretta J. Taylor, Joseph A. Walker. 

Educational Policies and Curriculum — Joseph H. Douglass, Chairman ; Mar- 
guerite S. Frierson, Helen A. Hucles, Lenna M. Means, John W. Parker, 
Mae H. Seabrook, Lois P. Turner. 

Library — John W. Parker, Chairman; Teresa M. Callendar, Katherine W. 
Douglass, Bronetta H. James, Henry L. James, Lula S. Summerville, 
Mamie Wilkerson. 

Public Relations and Public Programs — L. H. Robinson, Chairman ; Ebbie J. 
Dorsey, Lila L. Harper, Mildred S. Johnson, Mary E. Terry. 

Religious Life and Activities — Mildred W. Newton, Chairman; Clarence A. 
Chick, Susie S. Davis, Henry L. James, Werner L. Jordan, Harold L. 
Scott, Olivia T. Spaulding. 

Health and Safety — Daniel A. Williams, Chairman; Lorena L. Coppage, 
Florence P. Eaton, William A. Gaines, Lila S. Haywood. 

Student Life and Conduct — Joseph H. Douglass, Chairman; Clarence A. 
Chick, Marguerite S. Frierson, E. Louise Murphy, Andrew L. Scott, Mae 
H. Seabrook, Daniel A. Williams. 

Social Life and Recreation — Lauretta J. Taylor and Henry M. Eldridge, Co- 
Chairmen; Lorena L. Coppage, Susie S. Davis, Edna L. Jefferson, Thelma 
J. McDaniel, Lafayette Parker, Andrew L. Scott, Nannie T. Smith, Olivia 
T. Spaulding, Ethel L. Taylor, Sylvia E. Walcott. 

Audio-Visual Education — Werner L. Jordan, Chairman; Allen H. Brown, 
Henry M. Eldridge. 

Counseling and Guidance— Minnetta H. Scott, Chairman ; Selena W. Ashe, 
Helen T. Chick, Willie M. Gannaway, E. Louise Murphy, John W. Parker, 
Olivia T. Spaulding, Joseph A. Walker, Hattie D. Whyte. 

Buildings and Grounds — John B. Scott, Chairman; James E. Coppage, Henry 
M. Eldridge, Edna L. Jefferson. 

Resource Use Education — Allen H. Brown, Chairman; Clarence A. Chick, 
Werner L. Jordan, Leonard H. Robinson, Andrew L. Scott, Daniel A. 
Williams. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 



For the origin of the Fayetteville State Teachers College, and incident- 
ally for the beginning of public education for both white and Negro youth 
in North Carolina, we must go back to 1867, when seven Negroes — 
Matthew N. Leary, A. J. Chestnutt, Robert Simmons, George Grainger, 
Thomas Lomax, Nelson Carter, and David A. Bryant — paid $140 for a 
lot on Gillespie Street % and converted themselves into a self-perpetuating 
board of trustees to maintain this property permanently as a site for 
the education of Negro children of Fayetteville. General 0. 0. Howard of 
the Freedmen's Bureau, one of the best known of the early friends of 
Negro education, erected a building on this lot, and the institution thus 
established became known as the Howard School. 

Under the leadership of Robert Harris, its first principal, the Howard 
School soon attracted state-wide attention. Dr. M. C. S. Noble, of the 
University of North Carolina, in his History of the Public Schools of 
North Carolina, described Mr. Harris as "a colored man of tact, scholar- 
ship, and success as a teacher," and the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction in his annual report for 1869 refers to the Howard School as 
"the best in the state for colored children." Likewise, Dr. Noble stated 
in his history that on one occasion when six Negro boys and five white 
boys were called upon to sign their names to their testimony as witnesses 
in a court trial, the six Negroes were able to sign, because of their training 
at the Howard School, but the five whites had to make cross marks because 
of the lack of schooling. This incident so aroused the citizens of Fayette- 
ville that they immediately set up a graded school under the leadership 
of Alexander Graham, father of Frank Graham, formerly president of the 
University of North Carolina. In 1881 the Peabody Fund employed Alex- 
ander Graham to canvas sthe State with a view of establishing graded schools 
at other points; the Howard School was employed as an example of the 
community-wide benefit of public school education. Such was the far- 
reaching influence of the Howard school, established largely through the 
initiative of seven progressive Negroes of Fayetteville. 

In the meantime, the North Carolina Legislature had made provisions 
for the training of both white and Negro teachers. A summer normal 
school was begun for white persons at the University of North Carolina, 
and the Howard School was chosen as the normal school for Negroes. 
It was designated as a teacher-training institution, and in 1877 an act 
of the State legislature changed the name to the State Colored Normal 
School. The classes were conducted in the three second-story rooms of 
the Howard School building with the lower floors being reserved for the 
primary grades. Robert Harris, whose efficiency as an educator had by 
this time attracted wide attention, was retained as principal; his staff 
consisted of two assistants. The State Legislature appropriated $2,000 
annually for the support of the school. This amount apparently remained 
constant for many years. 

Three years after the establishment of the Normal School, Mr. Harris 
died, and Mr. Charles W. Chestnutt, by this time well known as a writer 
of fiction, was chosen to succeed him. Three years later, Mr. Chestnutt 
resigned to devote his time to writing and to the practice of law in 
Cleveland, Ohio, and Mr. Ezekiel Ezra Smith, who, though still a young 
man of 31 years, and who had been for five years the principal of a school in 
Goldsboro, was chosen to head the State Normal School at Fayetteville. 
So began Mr. Smith's connection with the institution, which, with two 
interruptions, he headed for fifty years. During his first absence in 1SSS. 
when he was appointed Minister Resident and Consul General of the 



r 



14 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

United States to Liberia, his duties were performed by Mr. George H. 
Williams, who had been connected with the institution for many years. 
On the occasion of his second absence, when he served as Adjutant of the 
Third North Carolina Volunteer Infantry, his work was carried on by 
the Reverend R. E. Fairly, a Presbyterian clergyman and a graduate of 
Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. 

Under the administration of Dr. Smith the State Normal School made 
steady progress. An indefatigable worker and a devout Christian gentle- 
man, he insisted that since the institution was designed primarily to 
prepare teachers for the elementary schools of North Carolina, training 
in Christian character should go hand in hand with formal classwork. This 
dual emphasis was stressed in order that the teachers graduated from 
the institution might be prepared to assume positions of leadership and 
to set examples of good conduct in the communities to which they might 
be called to serve. 

Dr. Smith saw very early that the small institution that he was called 
to head in 1883 had a great future and that expansion was both possible 
and desirable. For several years he worked to secure a good location. 
Each year he patiently outlined the needs of the school and the required 
aid for realizing them. At the same time, he gave generously of his own 
means in order to build a greater institution. 

After twenty-five years in a Gillespie Street Building, the school was 
moved to Ashley Heights, a mile west of its first location, and four years 
later it was returned to the city and was located for two years in a rented 
hall on Worth Street. With money available from the Legislature for a 
building, but with no site on which to erect it, there was some talk 
of removing the school to some other city. Local pride was aroused, 
however, and a number of representative citizens, both white and colored, 
joined Dr. Smith and his efficient Vice Principal, Reverend J. G. Smith, 
in a determined effort to keep the school in Fayetteville. Among the 
colored citizens who took active part in the effort to prevent the 
transfer or closing of the school were Mr. T. W. Thurston, Dr. P. N. 
Melchor, Messrs. Fred Douglass Williston, N. E. Williams, and Thomas H. 
McNeil. The three last-named citizens, Messrs. Williston, Williams, and 
McNeil, signed a promissory note to obtain funds with which to purchase 
the present site on the Murchison Road. This site, now within the city 
limits, originally consisted of fifty acres, but has been increased to 92" 
acres by gifts of adjacent land by the late Dr. and Mrs. E. E. Smith. 

The contribution to the growth and development of Fayetteville State 
Teachers College by Mrs. Nannie Goode Smith, wife of the first President 
Dr. Ezekiel E. Smith, has been of greatest significance. For most of the 
50 year period during which Dr. Smith was President, Mrs. Smith ren- 
dered invaluable assistance to the youth, faculty, and others interested in 
the progresisve development of the school. Her devotion transcended 
that of objective interest as demonstrated by her innumerable personal 
kindnesses. By way of her devotion she served as Business Manager of 
the institution for thirty years practically without compensation. Not 
only did she sell to the institution a vast tract of land lying east of the 
present site of the school for a very nominal sum, but she also donated 
to the college the land on which the Smith Athletic field is located, and 
the land to the North of the Athletic field on which a municipal swimming 
pool and recreational development are located by special arrangements 
with the institution. Mrs. Smith served constantly as a source of 
encouragement, and her personal kindnesses are reflected in the success 
of innumerable persons who came in contact with her. Mrs. Nannie 
Goode Smith died on June 22, 1942. 

The first building erected on a new site was the Aycock Hall, completed 
in 1908. Vance Hall, then a dormitory for young women, followed two 
years later. During the succeeding years the physical plant has been 
steadily expanded until now it consists of fourteen brick and several frame 
structures. As the institution grew the student enrollment increased 



FAYETTEVILLB STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



15 



and the faculty grew in numbers. The high school was later elimi- 
nated and the curriculum consisted of a two-year normal course for the 
preparation of elementary teachers. 

Dr. Smith resigned the presidency at the institution in July, 1933, 
and became President Emeritus. He was succeeded by Dr. J. "Ward 
Seabrook, whom Dr. Smith had called from a professorship at Johnson C. 
Smith University in 1922 to become vice-principal and later Dean of the 
State Normal School. Five months after his retirement, the long and 
useful life of Dr. Smith came to a close. He died as a man who had 
expanded enormously the institution which he had served so long. 

During the administration of President Seabrook the institution has 
continued to make progress. Five of the new brick buildings and two 
frame structures have been erected under his administration and repairs 
and improvements have been made on others. The 1950-51 school term 
saw the construction of an auditorium at a cost of $285,000, a dormitory 
for women at a cost of $227,680.64, and the renovation and equipment 
of the Dining Hall at a cost of $36,481.43. In May, 1937, the State Board 
of Education authorized the elaboration of the institution into a standard 
four-year college leading to a Bachelor's degree in education and to the 
Class "A" Teacher Certificates. 

On March 23, 1939, the State Legislature changed the name of the 
school from the State Normal School to the Fayetteville State Teachers 
College, thereby granting it specific authority to prepare elementary 
teachers and school principals for the schools of North Carolina. On May 
22, of the same year, the State Department of Public Instruction accredited 
the institution as a standard teachers college. Three days later, Governor 
Clyde R. Hoey delivered the Commencement address and was an interested 
spectator at the awarding of the first Bachelor's degree. Prior to the war 
emergency, the enrollment of Fayetteville State Teachers College exceeded 
the seven hundred mark thus placing it among the largest of the Negro 
institutions in the State. 

The College was granted the Class "A" rating by the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges on November 29, 1947. 



I 



:\r 



AIMS OF THE COLLEGE 



The aims of the Fayetteville State Teachers College are: 

1. To prepare teachers for the nation's public elementary schools. 

2. To develop law-abiding, self-supporting citizens. 

3. To offer general education courses beyond the high school level that 
will be beneficial to the students regardless of their future vocation. 
To afford training in character and personality that will develop 
leaders in thought and conduct capable of setting examples of pro- 
priety and exerting a wholesome influence upon the persons with whom 

thev come in contact. 



K-£- (V^AA.onfc ^^-BTTILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

/Smith Adjoixistkatiox Btildixg, erected in 1922, contains the administra- 
tive offices,(jthe_college auditorium, eleven classrooms and the post office. It 
' is constructed of brick and consists of two stories and a ground floor which 
|/* M houses a recently-renovated canteen and a recreation room operated by the 
I Young Women's Christian Association. 

Aycock Hall, which was the main administration building before the 
erection of the more commodious Smith Administration Building, is a two- 
story brick structure with five classrooms. It was erected in 1908, and 
is the oldest brick building on the campus. 



16 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The Robert R. Taylor Science Hall was completed and opened for use in 
September, 1939. This building is a modern brick structure with general 
classrooms, a large lecture room, and laboratory facilities for work in the 
natural and physical sciences, and in the household arts. 

The Henry W. Lilly Gymnasium, completed in 1938, is considered one *^~) 
of the best structures of its kind in the State. It is equipped with offices, ' 
shower, and toilet facilities for men and for women. In the gymnasium ( 
proper are folding bleachers, a balcony, and a large stage, making possible 
its conversion into an auditorium for the accommodation of large groups 
for special occasions. 

The Industrial Arts Building, erected in 1923, is a two-story brick 
building equipped for instruction and laboratory work in manual training 
and shop work. 



/ The Charles Waddell Chestnurr Library was completed July 15, 1937. 

/it houses stack rooms, conference rooms, a classroom, and the librarian's 

/ office. During the year 1941 the Library was enlarged. This addition pro- 

^r- I vided space for books purchased through the generous gift of the Carnegie 

Corporation of New York. 

Vance Hall, a recently-renovated brick building of two stories and a 
ground floor, contains modern living accommodations for faculty members. 
It was erected in 1910 and was formerly used as a dormitory for students. 

i-y Bickett Hall, for young women, was erected in 1922. It is of brick stru 
Ojture of two stories and basement. Present plans in the budget call for its 
I complete renovation. 

Robert Harris Hall, a dormitory for young women, was completed in 
June, 1938. It is a building of two and one-half stories with splendid 
modern appointments. It furnishes living accommodations for more than 
100 young women. 

James Walker Hood Hall, a dormitory for men, was completed and 
opened for use in September, 1939. The building affords comfortable 
modern living accommodations for 96 young men and in addition has five 
rooms with private bath for faculty members and guests, an infirmary, and 
a large foyer. 

Joyner Hall, a dormitory for young women, was erected in 1930. It is a 
well-appointed brick building two stories and a ground floor and is equipped 
with modern conveniences. It furnishes living accommodations for ap- 
proximately 100 young women. 

Newbold Laboratory School, a modern brick structure, erected in 1930, 
houses sixteen classrooms, six practice rooms, a cafeteria, a library, a 
teachers' rest room, a nurse's room, and an auditorium-gymnasium. Approx- 
imately 700 elementary school children are enrolled in the classes and it 
serves as the laboratory or practice school for student teachers in the 
College. Through a Federal Grant of $29,000, four rooms were added to 
the Newbold Laboratory School in order to accommodate children of the 
local defense areas. 

The H. L. Cook Dining Hall, a brick building with kitchen, storeroom, and 
a refrigeration plant as well as the dining hall proper, was completed in 
1923. The dining hall is capable of seating approximately 500 persons. 
The pantry and serving rooms of- the dining hall were enlarged during 
1941. — C-* < 

The Laundry was completed in 1923. It is equipped with machinery operat- 
ed by steam and by electricity. This building was enlarged during the sum- 
mer of 1941. 

The E. E. Smith Athletic Field was built on a site of 7 V^ acres adjacent to 
the campus. The site was donated by the late Mrs. Nannie L. Smith, widow of 
the late president of the Institution. It is hoped that a stadium may be 
erected on this site in the near future. The field has a grandstand, bleachers, 









-€-«- 



V/v-^ <— ' 



s '. 



- • | ' YV~\ 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



17 



and equipment for football, baseball, tennis and track practice and com- 
petitions. 

Ih addition to the brick buildings already described, there are the 
President's residence, four teachers' cottages, and a dairy, all of frame con- 
struction but attractively and modernly equipped. The President's home 
was erected in 1923. The teachers' cottages were erected in 1923, 1938 
and 1941 respectively. 

A monument erected to the memory of Dr. E. E. Smith stands in front 
of the library. Completed in 1938 this monument was the result of a 
project sponsored by the Alumni Association and made possible through 
funds contributed by friends of Dr. Smith and of the Institution. 

A WPA project consisting of grading, landscaping, planting trees and 
shrubbery, and constructing roads and walkways was instituted during 
the 1938-39 school year. Included in the project were the hard-surfacing 
of the main campus road and the laying of cement walks to the various 
new buildings. 

The total value of the plant is over a million dollars. 

The legislatures of 1947 and 1949 appropriated approximately one mil- 
lion dollars for permanent improvements at Fayetteville State Teachers 
College. 

At the conclusion of the present building program the value of the plant 
will be approximately doubled. 



WHO SHOULD ATTEND 



While the opportunities for receiving satisfactory placement in the 
North Carolina elementary school are still considerably greater than 
those for receiving placement in the high schools of the State, the reports 
of the State School Commission indicate that the shortage of elementary 
school teachers is rapidly being overcome and that before long only the 
very best qualified candidates may feel reasonably sure of placement. The 
equalization of salaries is tending to attract to this State persons of 
excellent scholastic training from some of the best educational institutions 
in the country. Fayetteville State Teachers College, therefore, seeks students 
with intellectual ability, common sense, good health, good character, and a 
genuine interest in the work of teaching. 

In addition to its teacher education function, Fayetteville State Teachers 
College offers courses in general education which are useful for students 
who plan to spend only two years in college or who wish to continue their 
education in some field at other institutions. These general education 
courses are offered principally on the freshman and sophomore levels. 
Friends of education are asked to recommend to Fayetteville those young 
people who give evidence of constituting good teacher material. 



WHY ATTEND FAYETTEVILLE STATE COLLEGE? 



1. Because reports of the State School Commission consistently indicate 
that there are about eight times as many elementary school teachers em- 
ployed as there are high school teachers; and that therefore opportunities 
for placement in the elementary schools are much greater than those for 
placement in the high schools. Many of the graduates of liberal arts 
colleges, unable to secure positions in the high schools, are teaching in the 
elementary schools, even though their salaries are cut twenty per cent be- 
cause they are teaching out of their field. 

2. Because the four-year curriculum at Fayetteville leads to the Bach- 
elor's degree and to the grammar grade "A" or the primary "A" certificate. 



18 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

3. Because in North Carolina the pay for teachers in the elementary 
schools is on the same basis as that of teachers in the high schools — the 
basis of training, efficiency, and experience. 

4. Because high school graduates, in rapidly increasing numbers, have 
been entering Fayetteville State Teachers College, to take advantage of 
the superior facilities, well-prepared faculty, and safe and comfortable living 
conditions existing in this well-known institution for the education of 
teachers. 

5. Because at Fayetteville are found interesting and profitable student 
clubs, and inspiring religious organizations. 

6. Because at Fayetteville one finds an atmosphere conducive to whole- 
some, purposeful living. 



SELF-HELP OPPORTUNITIES 

The low rate of fees and other expenses and the smallness of the appro- 
priation from the legislature prevent the Fayetteville State Teachers Col- 
lege from offering scholarships or free tuition. A few work positions that 
grant a reduction in board and lodging are given to worthy students. 
These positions are given only to students of proved ability, industry, and 
character. If these students do not maintain high efficiency in their school 
work, the aid is given to others more deserving. 

From time to time opportunities arise for students to earn money at 
occasional or permanent work with families or business houses in the city. 
Older students whose character and industry are known are naturally favored 
for these positions. 

Neiv students are not encouraged to come to Fayetteville with the expecta- 
tion of earning all or even a considerable portion of their expenses through 
work either on the campus or in the city, unless assurance of such aid has 
been given them in advance. 



WHAT TO BRING 

Students (and faculty members living on the campus) must furnish their 
own bedding, hence should bring with them quilts, blankets, at least four 
sheets, spreads, pillows and pillowcases. They should also bring curtains, 
bureau scarfs and other articles necessary to beautify their rooms. In 
addition, students should bring rubbers, galoshes, raincoats, umbrellas, 
shower caps, shower shoes, and laundry bag. Each article and all clothing 
should indicate the student's name in indelible ink. 



TEXTBOOKS 



Students are expected to owntextbooks, and to purchase them at the 
beginning of each quai'ter. The prompt purchase of textbooks may help to 
prevent unsatisfactory class work. The books may be purchased at the 
institution at an approximate cost of fifteen to twenty-five dollars per quarter. 
In addition, every student should own a dictionary. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College encourages all students to participate in extra-curricular 
activities. Since the primary concern of the institution is with the student's 
maintenance of proficiency in the various academic fields, however, students 
who are placed on scholastic probation, or who otherwise have poor academic 
records are discouraged from such participation. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 19 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The religious activities of the college are non-sectarian. 

The two student organizations of a religious nature — the Y.M.C.A. and 
the Y.W.C.A. — are factors of inestimable value in the development of Chris- 
tian character and leadership. Through their varied programs the young 
men and women are aided in developing well-rounded personalities as a 
preparation for creative living. 

Regular Sunday School Services are held every Sunday morning. The 
Services are conducted by the students. These services are designed to 
create an active interest in religious activities and to develop honest, reliable 
young men and young women. 

Vesper Services are held periodically throughout the year. Speakers of 
renown are obtained for Vesper Services. 

Chapel exercises are held regularly on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
of each week. Although these services may be the occasion of a wide 
variety of programs, they are usually devoted at least in part to religious 
service and to meditation. 

Every year a week is set apart as Spiritual Emphasis Week during which 
a religious leader of experience and national repute is brought to the 
campus as a special speaker for regular chapel and evening services. 
Students also are given an opportunity to confer with the leader and discuss 
with him their spiritual problems. 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

Under the supervision of the Social Committee, social gatherings are 
arranged from time to time at which students may mingle for a few hours 
of wholesome enjoyment. Certain organizations may also sponsor teas and 
other gatherings of informal, semi-formal or formal nature. 

All social gatherings whether sponsored by the College or by some 
particular organization must be held on the campus under the direct 
supervision of the Social Committee. Ordinarily attendance at such gath- 
erings is limited to persons connected with the College. 

From time to time young women of the College, who have permission 
from their parents, may attend social affairs off-campus. Off-campus social 
affairs are chaperoned by members of the faculty. 



ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

Fayetteville State Teachers College is a member of the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Conference. The Conference is composd of colleges in 
the Middle and Southern Atlantic States. Fayetteville State Teachers Col- 
lege has been the Basketball Champions of this Conference for the past 
three years. - _ •— — 

Football, baseball, and men's and women's basketball are major sports at 
the College. Tennis, track, and other sports constitute an important part 
of the athletic activities. 

Schedules in sports include contests with some of the strongest teams 
in the Colored Inter-collegiate Athletic Association, the Central and the 
Southern Conferences. Both the men and women's basketball teams have 
maintained positions among the top-ranking teams in this section of the 
South. 

Intra-mural and recreational activities in a variety of sports afford 
wholesome opportunities of an educational nature for students who may 
not be members of the varsity teams. 



20 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Association of Childhood Education. The Fayetteville State Teachers 
College Branch of the Association for Childhood Education was organized 
in the spring of 1950. This organization is a student branch of the Asso- 
ciation for Childhood Education International, which has as its purpose 
working for the education and well being of children and giving active 
cooperation to all groups interested in improving the lot of children in home, 
school, and community. All students interested in its purpose are eligible 
for membership. 

The Charles Waddell Chestnutt Book Club was organized to bring the 
resources of the library to the attention of the faculty, students, and citi- 
zens. Among the important aims of the club are the following: (1) To 
offer a non-credit course in "Library Appreciation" for prospective student 
library assistants and prospective elementary teacher-librarians; (2) to 
conduct a story hour for the children of the community; (3) to safeguard 
the resources of the library. 

Dormitory Associations: In keeping with the democratic principle, there 
has been instituted on the Campus a system of "Dormitory Associations" 
in each dormitory of the College. Through this channel every student who 
is a resident of the Fayetteville State Teachers College has a share in the 
formulating, planning and operation of dormitory regulations in coopera- 
tion with the Matrons and the Student Life and Conduct Committee. Stu- 
dents elect their own officers, foster their own programs and projects, and 
engage in cooperative living. Dormitory recreation, morale, cleanliness, 
physical health and Christian living are a part of the scope of these 
organizations. Every student upon admission to the College as a Campus 
resident automatically becomes a member of the particular Dormitory Asso- 
ciation in the building to which he or she is assigned. Students who do not 
live on the campus have an organization similar to the dormitory asso- 
ciations. 

The Drama Guild is maintained for students who wish to develop their 
abilities in the arts of play production. Special emphasis is placed upon 
acting, directing and appreciation of dramatic literature. Fayetteville 
State Teachers College is represented through the Drama Guild in the 
following organizations: Intercollegiate Drama Association and Southern 
Association of Dramatics and Speech Arts. 

The 4-H Club was organized for the purpose of acquainting students with 
the function of one of the organizations with which they will work as teachers 
in rural communities and to give young folk practical information concerning 
health, sanitation, sewing, cooking, and recreation. 

The Future Teachers of America Club is composed of students who plan 
to follow teaching as a profession. It seeks to develop for young people 
who are preparing to be teachers an organization that is an integral part of 
state and National Education Associations, to acquaint teachers in training 
with the history, ethics, and program of the teaching profession, and to 
encourage the development of character and of scholarship. 

The Gilreath Club, whose membership includes the entire student body, 
meets regularly during one chapel period of each week to discuss topics of 
social, political, and economic significance. Its purpose is to stimulate in- 
terest in intelligent reading and discussion of current national and inter- 
national problems, and to create a desire for research. 

The Physical Science Club: The major objective of this club is to 
stimulate studies in the science fields other than those which must be con- 
fined strictly to the classroom. The club is also concerned with the de- 
velopment of those traits which assist in the making of satisfactory social 
adjustments. 



FAYBTTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 21 

Fraternities and Sororities. At the beginning of the 1950-1951 school 
term, the Administration approved the establishment of fraternities and 
sororities on the campus. Spade-work preparatory to beginning of these 
organizations is being carried forward by a student-faculty committee. 

Rho Beta Chi Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Scho- 
lastic Society: The national organization has chapters at many of the 
leading Negro institutions of higher learning. The purpose of the society 
is to promote high scholarship, to encourage sincere endeavor in all fields 
of knowledge and service, to cultivate a high order of personal living, and 
to develop appreciation for scholarly work and scholarly endeavor in others. 

Sigma Rho Sigma, a national social science recognition society, is com- 
posed of persons interested in and majoring in the social sciences who have 
earned an average of "B" or above in at least fifteen hours in the social 
science field with a general average of not less than "C" in other work. One 
of the prime purposes is to encourage study and promote research and to 
recognize achievement in the field of the social science. 

The Student Council. The Student Council was formally organized at the 
conclusion of the school year, 1948-1949. Prior to this time, students sat as 
members of college committees. 

The Social Science Club was organized during the year 1938-1939. Its 
purpose is to encourage and stimulate discussion and activities in con- 
nection with current social and economic problems. All students attending 
the College are eligible for membership, whether they are enrolled in social 
science classes or not. 

The Varsity Club is made up of young men and women who have won 
letters in the major sports as players or as managers or trainers. Its 
object is to promote good sportsmanship and to stimulate interest in ath- 
letic activity. 

The Veterans Club is open to all service men and service women of 
World War II who are in attendance at State Teachers College. Meetings 
are held each month during the school year. Improvement of veterans and 
their life at the school is the aim. 

"The Voice" is a student publication which affords practice in journal- 
ism. The paper is edited and managed by students. 

Women's Collegiate Club. This organization, open to all women students 
of the College, is designed to train for leadership, to maintain a close re- 
lationship between the College classes, and to promote events of social and 
cultural interest to the College and to the community. 

The Young Men's Christian Association: A companion organization to 
the Young Women's Christian Association, the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation seeks to inject the Christian spirit into the whole campus and 
community life. This organization emphasizes functional religion and 
seeks to achieve its ends through study, work and prayer. 

The Young Women's Christian Association is one of the most active 
organizations on the campus. It has an attractively furnished room in which 
the various committee meetings and small affairs are held. The Y.W.C.A. 
is represented by delegates to all important student conferences held in 
the Southern Region. The group is a member of the National Council of 
Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Red Cross College Unit: This organization is open to all interested 
men and women enrolled in the college. It operates within the regulations 
of the Institution but is a channel through which the community Red Cross 
Chapter services are extended to the College. First-aid, home nursing, and 
similar programs are some of the activities which are offered as opportunity 
for self-development and service. 



22 FAYETTBVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The College Choir is composed of singers selected by the music staff. 
It receives weekly training in four-part singing. This group furnishes music 
for the vesper services and on special occasions. It is also frequently called 
upon to make off-campus appearances in Fayetteville and neighboring cities 
and towns. 



LYCEUM ATTRACTIONS 

An opportunity for the wise expenditure of leisure is afforded by the 
series of artist recitals sponsored each year by the college. Musical and 
dramatic performances are brought to the campus which improve the 
aesthetic tastes of the students and afford relaxation from the regular 
routine of work and study. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association has recently launched a unification and strength- 
ening program designed to establish closer relations among the various 
branches of the Association and between the individual branches and the 
General Association. The executive committee aims to perfect a strong 
general organization made up of active local units cooperating to secure 
useful ends of benefit to the College and its graduates. In order to stimu- 
late better work in the classroom the Association offers scholarships to be 
awarded to students who prove themselves worthy according to qualifications 
to be suggested by the faculty and administration of the College. 




OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI FOR 1950-51 

A^lexander Barnes, President, Washington, D. C. 

Lafayette Barker, Yice-President, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Mrs. Hattie Dobbins, Corresponding Secretary, Teachey, N. C. 

Mrs. Addie 0. Williams, 'Executive Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Walter 0. Burton, Treasurer, Fayetteville, N. C. 



' 



■ 






SPECIAL INFORMATION 



FEES AND EXPENSES ~ 
(Totaled on a full yearly basis) 





Boarders 


Non-B 


Darders 


>. 


In-State 


Out-of-State 


In-State 


Out-of-State 


Registration 


4.00 

243.00 

45.00 

18.00 

60.00 


4.00 

243.00 

45.00 

18.00 

8. .00 


4.00 


4.00 


Board (9 mo. @ 27.00) 




Lodging (9 mo. @ 5 .00) 






Laundry(9 mo. @, 2.00 

Tuition 






60.00 
24.00 
6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 


84.00 




24.00 


Athletic Fee \ - 


6.00 
3/. 00 
Z.00 
3.00 
12.50 


6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 


6.00 


Library Fee../. 

Medical Fee...„ 


3.00 
4.00 


Lyceum Fee '. 

Activity Fee 


3.00 

2.50 




388.50 


412.50 


106.50 


130.50 



General Fees Payable at Entrance in September 



Registration '.; 


/ 


4.00 
20 00 
34.00 


4.00 
28.00 
34.00 


4.00 
20.00 


4.00 


Tuition L_. 

Board, Lodging, Laundery. 

Service Charge... k I 


28.00 


8.00 
' 6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 


8.00 


Athletic Fee V/ 

Librarv Fee .i. 

Medical Fee... A 

Lyceum Fee !.... 

Activity Fee i 




6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 


6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 


6.00 
-3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 










76.50 


84.50 


0.50 


50.50 



SCHEDULE OF PAY DAYS 





Boarders 




In State 


Out-of-State 




Board, 
Lodging, 
Laundry 


Tuition 
Fees 


Total 


Board, 
Lodging, 
Laundry 


Tuition 
Fees 


Total 


September 11, 1951 
October 9, 1951 


34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 


42.50 


76. SQ 
34.00 
34.00 
54.00 
34.00 
34.00 
54.00 
34.00 
34.00 


34.00 
34.00 
■ 34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 
34.00 


50.50 


84.50 
34.00 


November 6, 1951 






34.00 


December 4, 1951. .._ 

January 14, 1952 


20.00 


28.00 


62.00 
34.00 


February 11, 1952 






34.00 


March 12, 1952 


20.00 


28.00 


62.00 


April 9, 1952 


34.00 


May 7, 1952 






34.00 












306.00 


82 . 50 


388.50 


306.00 


106.50 


412.50 



24 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



NON-BOARDING STUDENTS 

Tuition & Fees 



September 11, 1951 
December 4, 1951... 
March 12, 1952 




It should be specially noted that the expenses listed above do not include 
money for textbooks and supplies (estimated at from $15 to $30 per quarter) 
or for purchase of material for home economics, industrial and fine arts, 
and physical education. Laboratory fees are not included for the science 
courses, industrial arts, fine arts, or home economics. 

Students who are not residents of North Carolina must pay an out-of- 
state tuition fee of $8.00 a quarter, or $24.00 a school year, in compliance 
with an act of the State Legislature. 



REFUNDS 

Within ten days from date of entrance refunds of fees and charges will 
be made in proportion to the time spent at the College. However, regis- 
tration fees are non-refundable after a student completes registration. 
Except for service fee, room and board and payments for ensuing quarters, 
no fees are refundable to a student withdrawing later than ten days from 
date of entrance. Students who withdraw from the college without notice 
to or permission of college authorities may forfeit all refunds. Room de- 
posits are not refundable. 



INFORMATION FOR PARENTS 

Money for school expenses should be sent by money order or by cashier's 
checks made payable to Fayetteville State Teachers College. Do NOT send 
personal checks. Sending currency through the mail is not to be recom- 
mended but if it is done the letter should be registered. Receipts will be 
sent immediately for money paid on students' school expenses. Be sure to 
send the money to the school and not to the individual student. 

The beginning of each school month, at which date all monthly bills are 
due and payable, is indicated on the Calendar of Announcements. 

All fees are due and payable in advance. 

As there is no day set aside for registration for the second and third 
quarters, and since students are required to attend all of their classes, 
parents are urged to send registration payments early enough for students 
to register at least one day before the quarter begins. 

Because of the high cost of food and other commodities, the school 
authorities are compelled to require prompt payment of all bills due the 
Institution. No appropriation is made by the Legislature to cover the food 
or housing of students, hence a student who is in arrears is in reality de- 
pending upon the students who pay. 

No deduction in board is made for late entrance or absences of less than 
one week. 

The buildings in which the students live are of brick construction and 
have all modern conveniences, including electric lights, steam heat and 
running water. Every effort is expended toward the end of making the 
dormitories comfortable and homelike. 

Requests from parents for their children to come home on week-ends 
should be sent at least one week ahead and should be addressed to the 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 25 

Dormitory Directress or to the Counselor of Women Students, and NOT sent 
in a letter to the student. The school authorities do not favor frequent 
trips home at week-ends, as they disturb the efficient scholastic work and 
extra-curricular activities of the student. Absences from class preceding 
or following week-end trips will not be excused save in exceptional cases. 

Students are not permitted to get married unless they have first gained 
the consent of their parents. This consent must be communicated by the 
parents to the College authorities prior to the marriage and must be 
approved by the College authorities. Students who violate this regulation 
will be automatically suspended from the institution. This applies to the 
entire period of matriculation, including vacations and holidays during 
the school term. 

All students must be examined by a physician selected by the school to 
determine the students' physical fitness. Additional examinations may be 
required at any time. 

The College has on its staff a full-time graduate nurse, whose services 
are devoted to the health of the students. 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 
Admission As A Freshman 

Students interested in coming to Fayetteville State Teachers College 
should write to the President for information and application blanks. Since 
the College receives more applications than it can accept, inquiries should 
be made during the student's senior year in high school. 

For admittance in September, the application should be received on or 
before July 15, preceding the September of the desired entrance. No 
application will be considered until all records and recommendations have 
been received. With the exception of special cases, for which written per- 
mission is required, no freshman will be admitted at the beginning of the 
third quarter. 

Each applicant must be a graduate of a standard high school in North 
Carolina, or of a high school outside the State rated as equivalent, must be 
recommended by his or her former principal as a fit candidate for the 
teaching profession, and must present evidence of having satisfactorily 
completed at least fifteen units of secondary work. 

Applicants who are graduates of four-year non-standard high schools may 
be admitted by examination. 



Admission as a Special Student 

Mature persons who are not interested in working toward a degree or 
who do not meet all of the entrance requirements may be admitted as 
special students. 

Special students are permitted to select courses most beneficial for their 
immediate purpose. They may take any number of hours not in excess of 
a normal load. 

A special student cannot become a candidate for a degree unless all 
deficiencies are removed and other requirements governing regular students 
are met. 



Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have completed work elsewhere equivalent to that done 
in the Freshman Class here are admitted into the Sophomore Class. The 
same principle operates for admission into the other classes. Cases in 
which the work is only approximately equivalent requires the making-up of 
deficiencies in summer school. Six six-week summer sessions are consid- 



26 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

ered equal to the work of one scholastic year, provided the proper subjects 
have been taken. 

A student transferring from another college must submit in advance to 
the Registrar a complete transcript of all credits earned in order that they 
may be evaluated and the student informed of requirements to be met at 
Fayetteville. This record must show that he left the college previously 
attended in good standing. 



Registration 

1. All students must register in person. 

2. A physical examination is a part of the registration process and must 
be taken by all students. 

3. The Registrar and the advisor assist the student in the selection of his 
courses. The student, however, is held responsible for taking courses 
in the proper sequence. 

4. Students are urged to register at the time designated in the school 
calendar. Failure to do so will result in a penalty. 



Change op Registration 

All changes of registration must be made through the Dean's office. No 
change is permitted after the third meeting of a 3 hour course and the 
second meeting of a 2 or 1 hour course from the close of the registration 
period. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for the second change. 

All students are required to follow the schedule outlined on their regis- 
tration cards. Any student who drops a course without permission from 
the Dean and instructor will receive a grade of "E" in the course. Any 
student who takes a course in which he is not properly registered will 
receive no credit in the course. 

Any student who elects, for any reason, to drop a course after the third 
week of school will receive a grade of "E" in that course. 



Normal Load 



All students shall be expected to take a normal load with the exception 
of students with high scholastic records who may be eligible for accelera- 
tion, and veterans without deficiencies. Any student not taking a normal 
load shall be classified as "irregular." A normal load consists of 13 to 16 
credit hours of work per quarter with the exception of certain students 
engaged in student teaching when the normal load may be 12 credit hours 
of work. 



Comprehensive Examination 

All students at the end of the Sophomore year shall be required to pass 
a general examination covering the work taken the first two years. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
Grading System 

A five-point grading system is used: A, B, C, D, and E. Explanation of 
the grades follows: 

95 — 100, A, Excellent scholarship. 
85 — 94, B, Good scholarship. 
70 — 84, C, Fair scholarship. 
60 — 69, D, Poor scholarship. 
Below 60, E, Failure scholarship. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 27 

Other symbols used in the grading system are: I, X, Dr. and Wr. 

The "I" indicates incomplete. It is given to a student who has satis- 
factorily completed the work of a course except for some particular item. 
All "I's" must be removed during the quarter following the one in which 
they are given if the student is in residence. In no case may an "I" be re- 
moved later than one year from the date it is placed on the record. If "I's" 
are not removed by the time stipulated, they automatically become "E's." 
"X" indicates that the student was absent from the examination for a legiti- 
mate reason. The regulation concerning I's governs X's. "Dr." indicates 
that the student dropped the course with permission. "Wr." indicates that 
the student withdrew from the institution. 



Credits 



One quarter hour of credit normally represents a class meeting one fifty- 
minute period a week for 12 weeks, or the equivalent. 

Certain art, music, physical education, and laboratory courses yield one 
quarter hour of credit for a class meeting two fifty-minute periods a week 
for 12 weeks, or the equivalent. 

Students who sing in the College Choral Club may receive one hour of 
credit per quarter. 

Students who have a major role in the Drama Guild productions may 
receive one hour credit and those in supporting roles may receive one-half 
hour credit. 

One quarter hour is evaluated as equivalent to two-thirds of a semester 
hour. 



Quality Points 



For determining scholarship and awarding honors the following system of 
point values is used: A, 3 points for each quarter hour of credit; B, 2; C, 1; 
D, 0; E, minus 1. The academic grades requiresd for graduation must yield 
at least 195 quality points. 



Classification of Students 
% 
The following minimum credits are required for the classification indicated: 

Freshman 0-46 quarter hours 0-46 quality points 

Sophomore 47 quarter hours 47 quality points 

Junior 98 quarter hours 98 quality points 

Senior 152 quarter hours 152 quality points 



Scholastic Probation 

For students other than Freshmen (to whom these regulations apply only 
at the end of the year) when the quality points per quarter fall below one- 
half of the load, the student is placed on scholastic probation the following 
quarter with a reduced load. At such time, however, if the student becomes 
deficient in one-fourth (25%) or more in the number of hours required for 
normal progress and one-half (50% ) or more in the number of quality points 
likewise needed, he shall be requested to withdraw for poor scholarship. He 
shall be required to remain away one quarter, at the end of which he may 
apply for re-admission. Any student dropped for scholarship twice shall not 
re-enter the college. Any student whose total scholastic average evidences 
1/5 D's or lower is ineligible for graduation. 



28 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Dean's List 

Each quarter the names of the students who have maintained a general 
average of "B" or above during the preceding quarter are published on the 
Dean's list. 



Attendance 

Students are expected to attend all Classes, Assemblies, Vespers and Chapel. 

Attendance at all class meetings and chapel is mandatory. No credit may 
be received for any course in which the student, for any reason, (including 
sickness, accidents, extra-curricular activities) fails to attend 3/4's of the 
number of hours the class meets. At such time as the student is absent 1/4 
of the scheduled class meetings he is automatically dropped from the course 
and may receive no credit. Absences, for any reason, up to the maximum 
for which credit may be received may result in the proportionate loss of 
quality points. 

When a student incurs successive absences in any class the instructor will 
warn the student and notify the Records Office. 

The penalty for "overcutting" shall be as follows: For each three absences 
(except for reasons allowed as established and adequate by a board of re- 
view), one quality point will be deducted from the total number of quality 
points the student has. The penalty, however, shall not exceed the number 
of points that would have been obtained had the student earned a "C" in the 
course in question or a "C" average when the penalty is applied to all of his 
courses. Students who drop a class or drop from school without permission 
will be listed as Dropped (Dr.), counted as absent and subject to the pen- 
alties for "overcutting." 

No student is permitted to withdraw from school unless he has secured 
permission from the proper authorities and has notified the Records Office 
and the Business Office. 

Explanations intended to account for absences for justifiable reasons 
should be presented in writing to the proper authorities and the action must 
be initiated by the student. 

It is highly important for each student to keep an accurate account of 
his own absences and check with his instructors in case of doubt. This 
is especially important for students with a quality point average of less 
than 1 (and for entering students). 

Attendance is counted from the first day the course starts. Students 
who are late registering are to be counted as absent but no absences for 
late registration are to be considered as exceeding the total number per- 
mitted to the student in that course or in the total of his courses. 

Students who are absent from a class more than two weeks during the 
quarter may not secure credit in that course for the quarter. Exceptions 
are made to this only if there are extenuating circumstances and the 
student demonstrates to the instructor that he has made up adequately the 
lost time. 

Students may be requested to withdraw when their health, conduct, 
attitude or lack of scholarship indicates the desirability of their leaving. 



GROUP ADVISERS AND COUNSELING COMMITTEE 

The students of Fayetteville State Teachers College are divided into con- 
venient groups, each of which is placed under a faculty adviser. The 
advisers study carefully the students in order to guide them toward the 
intelligent solution of their various problems. 

The dormitory directors talk with group advisers about the behavior of 
individual students, but the adviser's activity is not intended to abridge 
in any way the usual duties of the dormitory directors nor the responsi- 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 29 

bility of the faculty as a whole to seek and apply ways and means to make 
of the students the best possible citizens. 

In addition, the Counseling Committee is set up for the purpose of better 
realizing the aims of the College, through positive rather than negative 
measures. The Committee is especially interested in guiding the student 
in the development of those character and personality traits which go into 
the molding of good teachers and good citizens. 

The Thursday Chapel hour is the time regularly set aside for conferring 
with the students. The advisers and Counselor of Students, however, are 
available at other hours on call. 



EXAMINATIONS 



Final examinations in all subjects are scheduled at the close of each 
quarter. All students are required, to be present at the hour the final 
examination is scheduled. 

The grade of X is given only to students absent from the final exami- 
nation for an approved reason. Students absent from the final examination 
for reasons not officially approved ivill receive a failing grade for the exami- 
nation. 

Special make-up examinations for the removal of X's and I's are an- 
nounced each quarter. A fee of one dollar is charged those who wish to 
take these examinations. Students incurring these temporary or con- 
ditional grades must remove them at the first opportunity during their 
subsequent residence; otherwise the grade will automatically become a 
failure. 

Students wishing to qualify for student-teaching in the laboratory schools 
must make a satisfactory grade in a comprehensive examination covering 
the principal subjects taught in elementary school. 

All candidates for graduation are required to pass special examinations 
in handwriting and spelling. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE OFFERINGS 

\ 
The first two years of the college offerings consist of subjects which are 
similar to, or identical with the courses offered in liberal arts colleges. The 
professional or specialized offerings in the field of Teacher Education occur 
chiefly in the Junior and Senior years. As a result, it is quite practical for 
students who desire to prepare for fields other than teaching to transfer at 
the end of the Sophomore year to another type of institution. 






STUDENT TEACHING REQUIREMENTS 

The candidate for student teaching must have senior classification and 
have at least one quarter's residence at Fayetteville State Teachers College. 
In addition to the residence requirements he must have the following pre- 
requisites: 

1. 152 quarter hours and 152 quality points. 

2. 9 quarter hours must be in English Composition; 6 quarter hours in Ad- 
vanced Composition; 6 quarter hours in Speech; 3 quarter hours in Chil- 
dren's Literature with grade of at least "C" in each course for the 24 
quarter hours. 

3. Following course requirements with at least a grade of "C": 
Language Arts Methods 

Arithmetic Methods 

Elementary Science and Nature Study 

Introduction to Education 

Educational Psychology 

Child Psychology 

Tests and Measurements 



30 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Standard tests must be passed in the following areas: 

a. Arithmetic 

b. English 

c. Spelling 

d. Writing 

The Sophomore Comprehensive Examination must be passed. 
Recommendation for teaching by the Director of Student Teaching. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A graduate of Fayetteville State Teachers College who has completed the 
academic requirements inclusive of the student teaching requirements is 
eligible for a State Certificate to teach in the public schools of North Caro- 
lina. Candidates for graduation who desire to follow teaching as a career 
must have completed the requirements for certification. 

1. Total credit requirement. The candidate must have at least 195 quarter 
hours and 195 quality points and a 1 point overall average. 

2. Distribution of Courses: 

a. EDUCATION: 

The Pupil: 

Introduction to Education^ 3 quarter hours 

Educational Psychology 5 quarter hours 

Child Psychology 4 quarter hours 

Tests and Measurements 5 quarter hours 

Orientation 3 quarter hours 

The School: 

Arithmetic Methods 3 quarter hours 

Language Arts Methods 3 quarter hours 

Philosophy of Education 3 quarter hours 

Teaching and Practicum: 

Curriculum Development 3 quarter hours 

Student Teaching (Includes Observation 

and Classroom Management) 12 quarter hours 

b. ENGLISH: 

English Composition 9 quarter hours 

Advanced Composition 6 quarter hours 

Introduction to Literature 3 quarter hours 

Modern American Literature 3 quarter hours 

Fundamentals of Speech 3 quarter hours 

Speech for Teachers _ 3 quarter hours 

Children's Literature 3 quarter hours 

c. NATURAL SCIENCE: 

Biology 9 quarter hours 

Physical Science . 9 quarter hours 

Elementary Science and Nature Study 3 quarter hours 

d. MATHEMATICS: 

General Mathematics I 3 quarter hours 

General Mathematics II 3 quarter hours 

e. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 

Personal Hygiene — . 3 quarter hours 

Physical Education 3 quarter hours 

Advanced Games and Sports (Women) .... 3 quarter hours 

Gymnastic Skills and Calisthenics (Men) 3 quarter hours 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 31 

Principles, Practices and Procedure in 

Health Education _ 3 quarter hours 

Principles, Practices and Procedure in 

Physical Education 3 quarter hours 

Community and School Hygiene 3 quarter hours 

f. PRACTICAL ARTS: 

Household Arts — Clothing and Social 

Arts (Women) 2 quarter hours 

Household Arts — Nutrition and Health (Women)—. 2 quarter hours 
Industrial Art — Shop Work (Men) 6 quarter hours 

g. SOCIAL SCIENCE: 

Western Civilization 9 quarter hours 

Principles of Geography, World Geography, 

Regional Geography 9 quarter hours 

United States History 9 quarter hours 

American Government _ 3 quarter hours 

Principles of Economics 3 quarter hours 

Social Problems 6 quarter hours 

h. FINE ARTS: 

Music Appreciation 3 quarter hours 

Fundamentals of Music 3 quarter hours 

Music Education 3 quarter hours 

Drawing and Perspective 2 quarter hours 

Crafts ._ 2 quarter hours 

Public School Art 2 quarter hours 

Art Appreciation 3 quarter hours 

i. ELECTIVES 15 quarter hours 

Note: Graduation without student teaching requirements is permissible. 
Such graduates, however, cannot secure State "A" certificates. Students 
who desire to graduate under these conditions may substitute 12 quarter 
hours of electives in the place of the student teaching requirements. With 
this exception, the requirements for graduation are the same for all can- 
didates. 



DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE 

Upon graduation from the four-year curriculum the student will receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. In addition, the State 
Department of Public Instruction will issue to the graduate who has met 
the requirements, either the Grammar Grade A or Primary A Teaching 
Certificate, in accordance with the particular curriculum completed. 

A certificate for teaching in the schools of North Carolina will be issued 
only to those applicants who are 18 years of age or over. 



COMMENCEMENT 

Commencement exercises are held at the close of each school year, at 
which time degrees and certificates are awarded officially to all graduates 
who have completed their requirements at any time since the preceding 
Commencement. 



-PRIZES AND AWARDS 



The following prizes and scholarships were awarded at the 1950 com- 
mencement : 

The E. E. Smith and Nannie Goode Smith Memorial Award for excellence 
in scholarship in the graduating class — Harold Leroy Cushenberry. 



32 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The George H. Williams Memorial Award for superior scholarship in the 
graduating class — Herbert Kenneth Spruill. 

The Mary E. Perry Memorial Award for excellence in Music — Eloise Star- 
ling. 

The George MacNeill Award to the student best exhibiting the ideals of the 
College — William Richard Hill. 

The Edward Evans and Sallie Evans Memorial Award for good citizenship 
— William A. Carter. 

Rho Beta Chi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Society for 
excellence in scholarship in the freshman class — Emm McKinnon. 

The James DeCosta Raiford Memorial Award for excellence in Rural Prac- 
tice Teaching — Harold Leroy Cushenberry. 

The Esther McNeill Jefferson Memorial Award for superior scholarship in 
the freshman class — -John Scott Brown. 

The Mayme Worsham Seabrook Memorial Award for excellence in Home 
Economics — Nancy Lee Fennell. 

The June Cotton Boutte Memorial Award for excellence in courses in Edu- 
cation accompanied by superior womanly qualities — Virginia Wilhelmina 
McMillan. 

The Benjamin Griffin Brawley Award for excellence in the study of Sopn- 
omore Literature accompanied by a good citizenship record and by the promise 
of the candidate's becoming a useful teacher — Ruth Vernese McNair. 

The Jewel Box Award for the most, outstanding athlete — Smith Costen, Jr. 

The Allen H. Brown Award for excellence in Science — Ethel Earl Dudley. 

The Alpha Omicron Sigma Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Scholar- 
ship to the male student exhibiting high scholarship, character and leader- 
ship — Lawrence Jackson, Jr. 

The Gamma Upsilon Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Scholarship 
to the female student exhibiting high scholarship and superior womanly 
qualities — Gladys Bellamy. 

The Women's Collegiate Club Award to the veteran in the graduating class 
for excellence in Social Studies — William Richard Hill. 

__ — Alumni Scholarships . K^^/^O^s* — *^.JL- 

The Alumni of the College provided scholarships to be given to deserving 
students as of the next school year, 1950-51. The General Alumni gave $300, 
the New York Chapter gave $200,' and the Cumberland County Chapter gave 
$100. 



J- 


3 


"g CO 




c? 








*^ 


O 


p. 




^ 


3 




s ** ^ 


W 


Ph 


ft 


« 








w 








H 








« 








-< 








C3 








O 1 








rt 








z 






c 










Ph 




5 


g 



WWMNNCOHOS© 



co n ^f « 






a -So s 

__ d 5 > s 

§ -05 « 



.2 .2 



c 2 ■ 2 jj < "3 



ooooooOoo 

■a s » q -a *^ ^ 3 H 

.2 -a a § .2 . "2 S 

HHWOWBhSPh 



E * pe 



'i** 



od a 



Q £ P C <i 
co cc co CO CO 
o o o o o 



s | | H H 



S. -a >> 



CO ^H CO 



W O 



N ^ (D O 



Wo 



««■ 


O 


HH 


p 


O 


o 


u 


)— 1 


cS 


Ph 


<U 


Ph 


fH 


P 


Vl 


Q 


3 




o 




fe 



N M M N W W (N * 

o o o o o o o 



ba W H C ffi P 



H 


H 


Ch 




(J 


< 


s 


P 


o 




K 




Ph 


H 


O 


2! 


CO 


S 



S 




■s 




1 


^ 


g 


U 


= 




rj 






■a 


< 




§ 


s 


i/j 


a 


a 


■a 


£ 


a 






•a 


— 


= 


■a 


>> 












— 


< 


£ 


- 


a 


ft 


Ph 




£J 


o 


c; 




o 


c-j 


CM 




_. 


















C 


= 

H 


M S £ 


DQ 



M o 



£t> 



o 



n M H s O) 



CO -=* CM O 



,* 



o o o o 



w 

— "a E* 

H « Ph cg Ph pt ^ 

_, =a _- rt _ * 

o o o o 



W 



< T3 



a H H o W 







w 


o 












•^ 




.a 


















CO 


CO 


CO 


CO -^ 






PH 


£ 






: 


! o 


K 
















W 

^ 








.2 


= 


■g 


t< 


P 

O 1 








a 
a 


c 
Q. 

s 


o 


2 * 










o 


o 


3 

o 


"i a 


< 

Cm 








"3. 




3 


M — 










p 


73 


c 


' >. 












Ti 














Ph 


< 


HH 


P Ph 



O O — I O o 



H H H K ot 



34 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



W d 



W o 



co co as c^i 



rt. 




[ 




i -a 
1 s 


H 








! M 


H 










« 










<; 




a 






& 






S3 


-2 2; 


o- 


c 


3 


-§ 


2 




."§ 


c-3 




« 1 


CO 


5, 


-3 


£ 


"s t§ 


a, 
< 


n 


■g 


2 a 
























-5 


H 


C/2 


O fa 






CO 


CO 


CO CO 




o 


o 


o 


~H O 




CO 




CO 


CO CO 






3 


bi 


bb 






-o 


c 






<J 


fa 


w 


fa EB 



-3 1 



be cS 

13 H 



H 53 



K w fa fa 






•^ CO "tf CO CO 



•sfl-e i-S J 
S o J £ £ c2 ;g 

O O ^H o o o 



3 "S 



T3 ti 
fa = 



o ,v 3 H 
^ =Q g g_ 



g "§ n m co 



s-s 



(5 5 



■8 2 g „ 

§ 1 § 1 1 1 

« j3 ■ ^ ■« la 



uh-<p;ws 



O O r-l O 





a 


o 

w 


5 










9 


fe 


3 


CO 








O 

w 


£ 


1 


, 






fa 








d 


-3 
J3 


a 


H 








a 


a 


o 


P 








a 
jo 

> 







to CO »o 



S "* 


;> 


□0 

a 


•J H 


3 5 
o m 


J3 

o 




03" O 

h5 


O ^H 








-^ -^ 






.£ .£ 


3 3 








•73 -a 








fa fa 






w fa 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



35 



W o 



i-H CO 



«*£ 



MMMNNMn-* 



=3 fi 



^ ■& P3 



J I I I ES 
OtJ'O'OO 
— H H H - 



Ti ™ S r* ^ ^ >i cj 

3 1 33 3 2 1 I S 2 

« h ^ N M pj c3 ,-H C3 



o »- u 

fc O a 



3 3 3 3 



MBwasasfS* a: 









I § : .2 : J? g 



CO 3 



■---_■ -. ^-^1a 

-^O-ggWo-agmK.HQca 

IS 111 I 111- ill 

t- OO *-< C<I CO T-H 



CO H rt ro f 10 o 
—1 O — I «-■ — i —i "-i 
i — I N ^* ^* ^J* ^* ^T 



3 3 3 3 3 3 3 



mOHHHHWHWWWWW 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Courses numbered one hundred are freshman courses; two hundred are 
sophomore courses; three hundred are junior courses; four hundred are 
senior courses. The third numeral in the number indicates the quarter in 
which the course is offered. 

Courses designated as Elective may be offered any quarter if demand for 
them from qualified students is sufficient. 

Course credit is computed on a basis of quarter hours for regular session 
courses and semester hours for summer school and extension courses. The 
credit hours given with the courses listed below are quarter hours. 



EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Educ. 101, 102, 103. Orientation. In its broadest sense the course is de- 
signed to aid the student in self-direction and self-discovery, with a spe- 
cial emphasis upon the student's adjustment to college work and environ- 
ment. It is organized ( 1 ) to acquaint the student with the history, 
policies and traditions of the institution; (2) to deal with such prob- 
lems as the budgeting of time, the developing of effective study habits, 
the preparation required for teacher preparation; and (3) to make the 
student aware of the importance of personal development and its rela- 
tionship to human relations. Credit: 1 quarter hour per quarter. 

Educ. 203. Introduction to Education. This course is designed to provide 
the beginning student in preparation for teaching as a career with an 
overview of the characteristic features of the American educational sys- 
tem together with an orientation of the fields of education. Three hours 
a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Educ. 301. Educational Psychology. Designed to acquaint the student with 
the psychological principles demanded by successful classroom operation. 
L^flMWfc— —Emphasis is placed upon the learning process as it is related to educa- 
tion. Five hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: five hours. 

Educ. 302. Child Psychology. This course deals with the growth of the child 
from birth to maturity. Among topics discussed are the following: 
physical and mental growth; social and mental development; conflicts 
and problems of childhood; behavior hygiene. Five hours a week, Win- 
ter Quarter. Credit: four hours. 

Educ. 303. Tests and Measurements. Designed to acquaint the student with 
the materials and methods available for analyzing student achievement. 
Standardized tests will be studied and students will be required to con- 
struct objective tests. Practice in scoring, interpreting, and recording 
data will be given. Five hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: five hours. 

Educ. 311-p. Arithmetic Methods for Primary Grades. This course treats 
of professionalized subject matter in arithmetic for teachers together 
with modern methods of teaching the subject in the first four grades of 
the elementary school. Among other matters attention is given to the 
psychology of arithmetic, to controversial questions regarding methods, 
to games, drill practice, exercises, and tests, and to diagnostic and reme- 
dial measures. Three hours a week. Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Educ. 311-G. Arithmetic Methods for Grammar Grades. A course which 
emphasizes the principles underlying the teaching of arithmetic in the 
grammar grades. Among the units covered are common and decimal 
fractions, percentage, measurement, graphs, problem solving, and certain 
testing programs. Three hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three 
hours. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 37 

Educ. 312. Language Arts Methods. This course considers the principles, 
methods, procedures and materials which can be used to provide ele- 
mentary school children adequate opportunities for growth and achieve- 
ment in the language arts. It includes special instruction in manuscript 
and cursive writing. Three hours a week, Winter Quarter. Credit: three 
hours. 

Educ. 401. Curriculum Development. A course which considers the mate- 
rials and organization of elementary school experiences in relation to 
child development. Special emphasis is placed on the integration of 
(A^Jfc -"""'' subject areas and the contribution of each to the total experiences of 
_.. the elementary school. Practice is provided in outlining resource units 
and in lesson planning. Three hours a week. Fall Quarter. Credit: 
three hours. 

Educ. 402. Philosophy of Education. This course seeks to aid students to 

acquire an insight into the progressive and conservative viewpoints in 

, education. The principles of the various schools of thought in education 

^4«r«$ — — ~ are discussed. The need for an integrated philosophy of life and of 

^^^ducation is emphasized. Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: 

l*i*f*** three hours. (This course may also be available (luring the Fall and 

Winter Quarter.) 

Educ. 411. Student Teaching. A preparatory course in student teaching 
which combines classroom management and observation in the elementary 
school with a consideration of some of the practical problems which con- 
front the beginning teacher. Ten hours a week. Fall Quarter. Credit: 
six hours. 

Educ. -412. Student Teaching. This course includes group teaching and an 
introduction to and assumption of whole-room responsibility. Under the 
guidance of critic teachers, student teachers receive practice in teaching 
heterogenous groups and groups formed on the basis of achievement. 
Experience is given in rural off-campus schools. Ten hours a week, 
throughout Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters. Credit: six quarter hours 
per quarter. 

Educ. 413. Principles of Guidance. This course is designed to provide one 
with a knowledge of the meaning, purpose and aim of guidance. Atten- 
tion is given to methods of investigation in guidance, methods of guiding 
students and the results of guidance. Special consideration is given to 
ways of improving guidance in rural schools. Three hours a week. 
Elective. Credit: three hours. 

Educ. 414. Mental Hygiene. A study of certain mental conditions as they 
disturb successful adjustment. Particular attention is given to normal 
and abnormal states of feelings and emotions, personality, defensive reac- 
tions, and sexual functions. Three hours a week. Elective. Credit: 
three hours. 

Educ. 415. History of Education. A study of the history and development 
of educational theory and practices from primitive, times to the present. 
Attention is given to the philosophers who have been responsible for 
educational method and procedure throughout the ages. Three hours a 
week. Elective. Credit: three hours. 

Educ. 416. Rural Education. A course designed for teachers and prospective 
teachers in small schools. Special consideration is given to those prob- 
lems which make teaching in rural schools different and difficult, with 
attention to the curriculum, modern teaching aids and environmental 
factors. Three hours a week. Elective. Credit: three hours. 

Educ. 417. Educational Sociology. In this course the aim is to provide an 
overview of the interrelationships of educational practices and problems 
to the social milieu. The relationship of educational theory and prac- 
tice to the needs of a highly dynamic society provide the major emphasis. 
Credit: three quarter hours. Elective. 









38 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Educ. 418. Religious Education. A survey of the world's major religious 
and sacred writings pertaining to them with special emphasis upon the 
Holy Bible, Judaism, and Christianity. References will be made to the 
political, economic, and social institutions prevailing during the Old and 
New Testament times. Elective. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
hours. 

Psy. v 411. Social Psychology. The interrelationship of the group and the 
individual provide the frame of reference for this course. It is concerned 
with the nature of the individual, the group, and the culture, as they 
function as determinants in the development of human nature and per- 
sonality. Credit: three quarter hours. Elective (prior courses in sociol- 
ogy or psychology are recommended but not required.) 






ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Eng. 101. Grammar and Composition. An intensive review of English gram- 
mar and the fundamentals of writing, with attention being given to the 
organization of the paragraph and to paragraph types. Three hours a 
week. Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 102. Grammar and Composition. A continuation of English 101, with 

* ^ stress upon outlines, organization, the formal business letter, and longer 

*V^*" expository themes. Three hours a week. Winter Quarter. Credit: 

three hours. 



d 



Eng. 103. Grammar and Composition. A course devoted to a rigorous re- 
view of English grammar, to exposition and to narration, including con- 
versation. A considerable portion of the time is given to the writing 
of themes. The major emphasis of the course falls upon themes that are 
firmly organized and are grammatically and rhetorically correct. Three 
hours a week. Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 



Eng. 201. Advanced Composition. This is primarily a theme course with a 
review of grammar and the mechanics of writing. While the emphasis 
falls upon exposition, some attention is given to the conventional four 
forms of discourse. Three hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three 
hours. 

Eng. 202. Advanced Composition. A continuation of English 201 with stress 
upon some common types of writing including the investigative paper. 
Three hours a week, Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 211. Introduction to Literature. A course designed for teachers in the 
elementary schools rather than for majors in English. Attention is given 
to the types of literature and to certain English and American classics, 
but the prime emphasis of the course falls upon current happenings in 
literature and in other areas of world society. The work includes a 
review of the principles of English composition. Three hours a week. 
Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 212. Modern American Literature. With its emphasis upon the wide 
reading of biography, essays and current periodicals, this course amounts 
to a political, social and literary orientation to the current American 
scene. The work likewise constitutes a follow-up of the work in com- 
position done in previous courses. Three hours a week. Winter Quarter. 
Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 302. Fundamentals of Speech. A course designed to develop force and 
clarity in oral expression. In the main, the work is concerned with the 
improvement of the voice, the discovery and correction of speech defects 
and interpretative reading. Three hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: 
three hours. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 39 

Eng. 303. Speech, for Teachers. A continuation of English 302 with consid- 
erable attention being given to parliamentary procedure and platform 
speaking. The course centers about the speech needs of the classroom 
teachers. Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 313. Children's Literature. This course offers opportunity for the 

reading, discussion and enjoyment of literature suitable for children of 

i* the elementary school. Critical evaluation of children's literature in 

Vr J e ^~r elation to the needs and interests of children. Particular attention is 

given to visual and auditory aids. Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. 

Credit: three hours. 

Eng. 411. The Negro in American Literature. A study of the principal 
works by and about Negroes. The course is developed as a segment of 
American Literature. Three hours a week. Elective. Credit: three 
hours. 

Eng. 412. Dramatic Techniques for the Elementary Teacher. Part I — Em- 
phasis upon the dramatization of scenes from literature and history. 
Part II — Selection, casting, rehearsing and staging of a dramatization 
from Part I. Recommended for all prospective elementary teachers. 
Three hours a week. Elective. Credit: three hours. (Laboratory fee). 

Eng. 413. Speech Development and Correction. A course dealing with speech 
problems likely to be encountered by an elementary school teacher. Three 
hours a week. Elective. Credit: three hours. Laboratory fee required. 



FINE ARTS 
I. Music 



Mus. 103. Music Appreciation. This course is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the history and development of music from early periods to our 
present day. Lectures, recordings and general readings are designed to 
present a large number of master works to the student. Special emphasis 
is placed on materials suitable for music appreciation in the elementary 
grades. Three hours a week. Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Mus. 202. Fundamentals of Music. A course designed to enrich the students' 
musical experience and broaden their appreciation and understanding of 
music. Study of major and minor scales; notation; time, oral and 
written dictation; curing of monotones; sight reading of exercises and 
melodies. Three hours a week. "Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Mus. 211, 212, 213. Class Piano. This course is designed to provide enough 
keyboard facility to enable the student to play the accompaniments for 
children's songs and for group singing. The course includes scales and 
easy keyboard technique. Elective. Two hours a week. Credit: one 
hour a quarter. 

Mus. 301-P. Music Education for Primary Grades. This course introduces 
methods and materials used to develop music in the primary grades. 
Rote songs; care and development of the child's voice; treatment of 
monotones; singing games; folk dances; practice teaching during class 
periods. Three hours a week. Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Mus. 301-G. Music Education for Grammar Grades. A course introducing 
methods and materials used to develop music in the intermediate grades. 
Rote songs, music appreciation, rhythmic development and care of the 
child's voice. Practice teaching during class period. Three hours a week. 
Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Mus. 311, 312, 313. Advanced Class Piano. A study of more advanced key- 
board technique, sight reading and memorization of simple repertoire, 
and a study of elementary harmony which includes the formation of 



40 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

scales, intervals, chords, and the harmonization of melodies and basses 
with simple inverted triads. Prerequisite: Class Piano 211, 212, 213 
or equivalent. Two hours a week throughout the year. Elective. Credit: 
one hour a quarter. 

Mus. 411. Advanced Music Education. Student teachers will receive prac- 
tice in teaching music to children in the various grades. For seniors 
I .-"'only. Credit: three hours. Elective. 

Mus. 412. Advanced Music Education. Materials, conducting and voice 
training. A study and evaluation of appropriate materials adapted to 
the musical interests of children for programs, festivals and concerts; 
principles of conducting, technique of the baton, and score reading; the 
study of voice production, principles of singing, and an opportunity for 
individual attention and performance. For Seniors only. Credit: three 
hours. Elective. 

II. Art 

Art 203. Drawing and Perspective. A course in elementary drawing and 

perspective. Foreshortening and perspective are introduced by the use 

^.V* of scenery, plants and buildings. The study of color and color harmonies 

^— is made by the use of charts and applying colors to designs. A chart 

A^UMt/ of single stroke lettering is made. Media: pencils, water-color, brushes, 

pens, India ink, rules, scissors, paste, compasses, paper, charcoal, bogus, 

unprinted news, construction, poster, oak-tag, and card-board. Four 

hours a week. Fall Quarter. Credit: two hours. 






Art 301. Crafts. This course offers experience in the making of useful arti- 
cles that are suited for elementary grades, such as book-ends, note pads, 
season cards, clay models, block prints, etc. Hand and hand loom weav- 
ing are taught with emphasis on the use of inexpensive and native 
materials. Materials: wood, clay, cardboard, cloth, oil cloth, paper, 
metal, tools and paints. Four hours per week. Fall Quarter. Credit: 
two hours. 

Art 302. Public School Art. A study of the objective, techniques, and pro- 
cedures for teaching art in the elementary school. The course acquaints 
students with state requirements for the various grade levels in art. 
Winter Quarter. Three hours per week. Credit: two hours. 

Art 303. Art Appreciation. The study of the progress of the arts in Amer- 
ica; also a survey of the outstanding art through the ages as depicted in 
paintings, architecture, sculpture and the minor arts. Spring Quarter. 
Three hours per week. Credit: three hours. 






PRACTICAL ARTS 
I. Household Arts 

H.A. 102. Clothing And Social Arts. A course which considers clothing as 
an aid to efficient social living; the development of technique in clothes 
/ management such as will lead to intelligent rather than emotional buy- 
ing. Construction work is required. Three hours a week. Winter 
Quarter. Credit: two hours. 

H.A. 103. Nutrition And Health. This course includes essentials of nutri- 
tion, nutritional needs of adults, symptoms of malnutrition and feeding 
of children. Oue hour lecture and two hours laboratory, Spring Quarter. 
Credit: two hours. 

H.A. 411. Cafeteria Management. This course offers an opportunity for the 
study of menu planning, recipes, organization of work, knowledge and 
care of equipment, use of records, and sanitation in cafeterias. Three 
hours a week. Elective. Credit: three hours. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 41 

H.A. 412. Principles of Home Living. Basic principles pertinent to cloth- 
ing the family, feeding the family, house planning and furnishing, con- 
sumer buying, budgeting, child care and training. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three hours. Elective. 

II. Industrial Arts 

I.A. 101, 102, 103. Shop Work. A course designed to enable students to be- 
come better schoolkeepers, better school teachers and home-makers. The 
-f student learns the names and uses of the various tools and is trained in 

^* C»* designing and making useful articles for school and home. Training is 

*^f.^Jt also given in making common and necessary repairs about school and 
*fl home. The economic aspect of manual arts is given ample consideration. 

The student is also taught vocational drawing in connection with projects 
to be made. Four hours a week throughout the year. Credit: two hours 
a quarter. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Hist. 101, 102, 103. History of Western Civilization. A comprehensive sur- 
vey of the origins, development and diffusion of Western Civilization 
from ancient times to the present day. This course is offered with a 
view to creating an understanding and appreciation of contemporary 
political, economic, social and cultural institutions and movements. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit: three hours a quarter. 

Hist. 201. United States History I. A study of the political, social and 
economic forces effective in developing the United States from its back- 
ground in "Western Europe through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed 
on the history of the Nation after the formation of the Constitution. 
Three hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Hist. 202. United States History II. This course is a study of the Nation 
from immediately after the sectional conflict to the present. Three hours 
a week, Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Hist. 203. United States History and Citizenship. In this course emphasis 
is placed on the phases of history needed to understand political organ- 
ization, party politics, federalism and local government. This course 
serves as a basis for intelligent citizenship. Three hours a week, Spring 
Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Hist. 403. History — American Government. An introductory course in 

y> American Government, reviewing briefly the historical background and 

5.^« purpose of political society, with emphasis on the structure and activi- 

£A*««-#ti» — ties of the American system, Federal, State, and Local. The major 

aims of the course are to develop politically well informed, loyal, and 

civic minded citizens. Three hours a week. Spring Quarter. Credit: 

three hours. 

Hist. 411. International Relations. A study of the present national poli- 
cies of the powers whose influence is dominating in international rela- 
tions, with an attempt to interpret these policies in the light of their 
basic factors, economic, ethnic, geographic, and historic. Special con- 
sideration will be given to causes and effects of war, postwar and re- 
construction problems and difficulties attendant upon attempts to estab- 
lish and insure permanent organized peace. Three hours a week. 
Elective. Credit: three hours. 

Geog. 101. Principles of Geography. Consideration of some elements of 
earth sciences, the geographic relationship, and a general survey of the 
interaction between man and his physical environment. Three hours 
a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 



42 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Geog. 102. World Geography. A general study of the distribution of 
production and consumption of the principal articles of commerce, with 
an analysis of the geographic basis of commerce. Three hours a week, 
Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Geog. 103. Regional Geography. The course describes the regional distri- 
bution of the world's resources, industries, and population. It analyzes 
the distribution and comparative importance of manufacturing, mining, 
forestry, agriculture, and trade in relation to such factors as power 
resources, raw materials, climate, landforms, centers of population, and 
world trade routes. Special emphasis is placed upon those regions 
which are of special interest to the United States in the post-war world. 
Three hours a week. Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Econ. 201. Principles of Economics. This course aims to teach an ele- 
mentary knowledge of the principles basic to an understanding of the 
'.M* science of wealth as these concepts operate in the production, exchange, 

jjU-e>fcy distribution and consumption of goods and services. Three hours a 
week, Fall or Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Econ. 411. Advanced Economics. The economics of government with 
special reference to the problems of local, state and federal finance and 
taxation; governmental regulations of the economy with special emphasis 
upon the regulations of wages and hours of labor, prices and agriculture. 
Elective. Three hours a week. Credit: three hours. 

Soc. 301, 302. Social Problems. This course deals with the problems of 
the social order, how they arise and possible solutions. Three hours a 
week. Winter and Spring Quarters. Credit: three hours per quarter. 

Soc. 411. Inter-Group Relations. This course is designed to acquaint the 
student with the origins, structure and implications of variant group 
identification primarily in the United States. Special attention is 
focused on minority group problems in social organization growing out 
of minority-majority identification. Proposed techniques for the amelio- 
ration of inter-group misunderstandings are considered. Elective. Credit: 
three quarter hours. (Prior courses in sociology are recommended 
though not required). 

Soc. 412. Marriage and Family Relationships. A course covering the major 
considerations in marriage — i.e. — mate selection, courtship, reproduction, 
etc. Emphasis is placed on the development of necessary viewpoints 
mandatory for successful and stable marital life in a dynamic society. 
Credit: three quarter hours. Elective. 

Soc. 413. Sociology of the Family. This course analyzes in some detail the 
institutional structure of the family, with emphasis placed on parental 
roles and parent-child relationships. Attention is given to the changing 
character of American family life and the relationship of the family to 
other societal structures. Credit: three quarter hours. Elective. 

Soc. 414. Urban Sociology. A study of the growth, development and nature 
of cities in American society with emphasis placed on urban institutions 
and the nature of personal relations in the urban environment. Credit: 
three quarter hours. Elective. (Prior courses in sociology are desirable 
but not required). 

Soc. 415. Criminology. This course covers the nature of crime; selective 
statistics of criminal behavior; theories with regard to the nature of the 
criminal; and the causes or condition of criminal behavior. Attention 
is focused on the juridical and penal systems in reference to the treat- 
ment of criminals. Credit: three quarter hours. Elective. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 43 

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

Natural Science 

Biol. 101, 102, 103. Biology. A study of the life history, structure, ecology, 
and economic influence of selected plant and animal types. Definite 
- j effort is directed toward the application of biological concepts to the life 
Jb&yJp-^ of the individual and community. The course aims to give such mastery 
as may be required for liberal education or as a foundation for further 
specialized study. Lecture-discussion, two hours; laboratory, two hours. 
Credit: three hours each quarter. 

Biol. 113. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. A course dealing with the 
structure of animals with particular reference to the construction and 
functions of the parts of the human body. Especial attention will be 
focused upon the organization and properties of the various organs and 
tissues with particular attention being placed upon the normal and 
healthy functioning of the body. Lecture-discussion, two hours; labora- 
tory, two hours. Credit: three hours. Elective. (For students desiring 
to transfer from the Teaching curriculum to one of Nursing, Medicine, 
or allied fields this course would prove to be of value as a prerequisite 
to these fields.) 

Sci. 201, 202, 203. Physical Science. A general survey of the nature of 

£. 7^. matter and forces operating in the universe, with special emphasis upon 

fundamentals of astronomy, chemistry, physical geography, and physics. 

— " A foundation for understanding the place of physical science in everyday 

life. Two hours group discussion and two hours demonstration a week, 

""^throughout the year. Credit: three hours a quarter. 

Sci. 303. Elementary Science and Nature Study. A study of the materials 
and methods used in teaching science in the elementary school. The 
content includes Biological and Physical Science. An important feature 
of the course is group work, in which students develop units which are 
presented regularly to the class and frequently to the pupils from New 
bold Training School. Special emphasis is placed upon student-made 
equipment and sources of free and inexpensive materials. Prerequisites: 
Biology 101-102-103 and Physical Science 201-202-203. Three hours 
per week, Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Chem. 201, 202, 203. Chemistry. A course covering the fundamental prin- 
^t ciples of chemistry. The work of the course considers the general prop- 

erties of matter, chemical and physical changes, the fundamental laws 
fl^t^jt^J —governing these changes, the important gaseous, non-metallic and metallic 
elements, their properties, reactions and uses. Two lectures and two 
double laboratory hours per week through three quarters. Elective. 
Credit: four hours. 

Math. 203. General Mathematics. , This course will investigate basic alge- 
braic properties of the number systems, starting with positive integers. 
The subject matter includes essentials in elementary, intermediate, and 
college algebra, but its presentation is guided by modern achievements 
in the field. The course centers around a rigorous development of the 
number system and leads to an investigation of variables and functions. 
The mastery of fundamental manipulative skills is not only consistent 
with, but also necessary to, a thorough understanding of mathematics. 
This approach not only serves to bring order into what appears to be 
disassociated facts and techniques, but also offers opportunity for reme- 
dial work. Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 



Vt^t 






I 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health Ed. 101. Personal Hygiene. This course will include the several 
aspects of personal hygiene. Emphasis is placed on the organic systems 
— normal and abnormal., and the conditions pertaining thereto, together 



44 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

with the rules of personal health which make for effective and affective 
living. Required. Three hours a week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three 
hours. 

Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103. Physical Education. This course is designed to 
teach games of all types. Individual contests, mass and small group con- 
tests, combative, relays and loosely grouped team contests with both 
--Indoor and outdoor application are presented. Required. Two hours a 
week each quarter. Credit: one hour each quarter. 

Physical Ed. Ill, 112, 113. Physical Education Skills. An analysis of tech- 
nique and skills. Emphasis is placed on the practice of fundamentals as 
related to team and individual play from the standpoint of teaching as 
''" well as personal skills. Leadership technique, improvisation, and various 
self-testing activities are taught. (Minors in Physical Education). Four 
hours a week each quarter. Credit: two hours each quarter. 

Physical Ed. 203. Advanced Games And Sports For Women. This course 
deals with a review of low and high organized team and individual games. 
Analysis, of rules, techniques strategy, and theories of play. Required. 
Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Physical Ed. 203. Gymnastic Skills, And Calisthenics. This course is de- 
signed to offer a selection of a wide range of free-hand, wand, Indian 
club, skipping rope, and dumbbell exercises, and is presented for the pur- 
pose of providing a working knowledge of materials for use in corrective 
work, demonstrations and general conditioning purposes. An attempt 
is made to teach skills in tumbling, formal and informal gymnastics. 
Required. Three hours a week, Spring Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Physical Ed. 311, 312, 313. Coaching, Officiating, And Practicum in Phys- 
ical Education. This course is designed to provide observation of ■coach- 
ing techniques and methods. The theories of coaching and teaching, 
types of offenses and defenses and styles of team play are covered in the 
major sports. Assignment to physical education classes as student in- 
structors in practical teaching and assisting is included in coaching and 
officiating of games and sports. (Minors in Physical Education). Two 
hours each quarter. Credit: one hour. 

Health Ed. 301. Principles, Practices And Procedures In Health Education. 
This course is designed to give study to the fundamental principles upon 
which health is based. Materials and methods of teaching health to 
elementary school children are studied along with health texts, pam- 
phlets and charts appropriate to varying age levels. Preparation for 
student teaching in this field is accomplished. Required. Four hours a 
week, Fall Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Physical Ed. 302. Principles, Practices And Procedures In Physical Educa- 
tion. A study of the principles of physical education with participation 
in games, calisthenics, plays, pageants and other activities appropriate 
to the elementary school level. Students are encouraged to make col- 
lections of materials which may be useful in their own teaching. Re- 
quired. Four hours a week, Winter Quarter. Credit: three hours. 

Health Ed. 403. School And Community Hygiene. A study of the funda- 
mental principles of sanitary science and disease prevention and their 
application to water supply, milk and general food supply, sewage dis- 
posal, school sanitation, and the general problems which deal with control 
of infectious diseases. Required. Spring Quarter. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three hours. 

Health Ed. 411. First Aid And Safety. Lectures and practice in standard 
first aid. Red Cross first aid methods are studied and participated in by 
all students. The development of proper attitudes, habits and knowledge 
of safety in the home, school, general environment, and in sports activi- 
ties is attempted. Elective. Fall Quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three hours. 






FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



45 



Physical Ed. 412. Folk And National Dances. This course includes the 
study of folk and national dances suitable for elementary schools with 
emphasis on their historical and ethnic significance. Elective. Spring 
Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one hour. 

Physical And Health Education 413. Organization, Administration And 
Supervision Of Health And Physical Education. This course deals with 
the administrative relationships and procedure in the conducting of school 
health and physical education programs. Differences between organizing, 
administrative policies, state responsibility, including staff organization, 
lines of authority and the patterns that exist in national, area, and local 
levels are' discussed. (Minors in Physical Education). Winter Quarter. 
Four hours a week. Credit: three hours. 



Health and Physical Education Requirements for Minors of 
Physical Education and All Students 



1st Quarter 
101 Hygiene 
101 Physical Education 
111 Physical Education 
Skills (Minors) 



301 



& Pr 



Prin, Prac, 
Health Ed. 
311 Coaching, Officiating 
& Practicum in Phy. 
Ed. 



411 First Aid & Safety 



Freshman 

2nd Quarter 
101 Hygiene 
102 Physical Education 
112 Physical Education 
Skills (Minors) 

Sophomores 



Juniors 

302 Prin, Prac, & Proc. 

Of Phy. Ed. 
312 Coaching, Officiating 

& Practicum In Phv. 

Ed. 

(Minors) 

Seniors 

413 Organization, Adm, & 
Supervision of Health 
and Phy. Ed. 
(Minors) 



3rd Quarter 
101 Hygiene 
103 Physical Education 
113 Physical Education 
Skills (Minors) 



203 Advanced games & 
sports (Women) 

203 Gymnastic skills & 
Calisthenics (Mne) 



313 Coaching, Officiating 
and Practicum in 
Education 
(Minors) 



412 Folk Dancing 



Health and Physical Education Requirements for Minors 
and All Students 

All Minors 

Health Education 101 Personal Hygiene 3 3 

Physical Education 101, 102, 103, Phy. Ed 3 3 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113, Physical Educ-Skills. 3 

Physical Education 203 (Advanced Games & Sports (Wonen) — (Gym- 
nastic Skills Men) _ ..... 3 3 

Health Education 301 Prin. Prac. & Proc. Health Ed.. 3 3 

Physical Education 302 Prin. Prac. & Proc. Phy. Ed 3 3 

Health Education 403 School & Community Hygiene.___ 3 3 

Physical Education 311, 312, 313 Coaching, Officiating & Practicum 

in Phy. Ed.... 3 

Physical Education 413 Organization & Adm. Superv. Health Ed. & 

Phy. Ed..___ 3 

Health Education 411 First Aid & Safety 3 

Total Quarter Hours 18 30 



46 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOLS 

The Newbold Training School, named in honor of Dr. N. C. Newbold, 
formerly State Director of Negro Education, is the campus laboratory school. 
It has twenty classrooms, six practice rooms, a cafeteria, library, a teacher's 
lounge, a principal's office, a clinic room, and an auditorium-gymnasium. 
It houses about 600 elementary school children. There are sixteen teachers 
all of whom are supervisors of student teaching. 

There is opportunity for work in directed teaching from the first grade 
through the eighth grade. Students enrolling in the course in directed 
teaching are assigned to one of the supervising teachers. The program as 
a whole is coordinated by the Dean of the College and the principal of the 
school. Every effort is made to give students the opportunity to deal with 
all aspects of classroom management, curriculum planning, study of indi- 
vidual children and other areas of responsibility which the prospective 
teacher will face in the field. The student teacher is led through observa- 
tion and participation to the teaching of small groups; from group teach- 
ing to accepting whole-room responsibility. When the student shows pro- 
ficiency in handling the entire group he is ready for rural observation and 
teaching. 

Rural school observation and teaching are maintained through the county 
schools in the neighborhood of the College. A program has been designed 
to afford practical experience to student teachers through participation and 
teaching in rural schools. Twelve rural schools in the neighborhood of the 
College are used for rural observation and teaching. These include one- 
teacher, two-teacher, three-teacher, and four-teacher schools. Through this 
rural teaching experience the student teachers gain knowledge of methods 
and practice as they apply to the smaller rural schools. 

The opportunity to observe and teach in the city and county schools is 
granted through the courteous cooperation of Superintendent Horace Sisk 
of the Fayetteville Schools, Superintendent F. D. Byrd of the Cumberland 
County Schools, and Mrs. Mae Rudd Williams, Supervisor of the Cumberland 
County Schools. 

Since student teaching at Fayetteville is regarded as a regular college 
course, it is carefully planned and graded. The graded steps offered are: 
(1) group teaching, (2) whole-room responsibility, (3) teaching beginners, 
and (4) rural observation and teaching. 

The program of student teaching is organized with a view to the realization 
or development of the following requirements: 

I. General: 

1. A broad general education supplemented by many cultural contacts. 

2. A thorough and progressive professional education. 

II. Specific: 

1. An understanding of children. 

2. Demonstration through the exploratory (directed observation) pe- 
riod that the teacher has some success in contact with children. 

3. Good health. 

4. Good personal characteristics. 

5. Good English usages. 

6. Knowledge of techniques necessary for gathering instructional ma- 
terials and organizing them for use. 

7. Knowledge of the subject area in which the teacher is to teach. 

8. A professional attitude. 



SUMMER SCHOOL AND EXTENSION 

In addition to the service rendered to students in residence during the 
regular session, Fayetteville State Teachers College also contributes mate- 
rially to the educational development of teachers already in the service of 
the State, through its summer school and its extension courses. It has done 



PAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 47 

more than its share in contributing to the rapid improvement in training 
in the past few years. All summer school and extension courses are taught 
by regular members of the College faculty and vary in content and method 
from the same courses as taught in the regular session only when such 
variation seems advisable in view of the specific needs of a particular class. 
College credit for these courses is granted, subject only to a few reasonable 
and necessary restrictions and regulations. 

It is to be specifically noted that credit for summer school and extension 
courses is computed in terms of semester hours, and not quarter hours, as is 
the case with regular session courses. 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Who May Attend 

The summer school is designed to fit the particular needs of the following 
types of students: 

1. Holders of the following certificates: 

a. Elementary A and B. 

b. Primary A, B, and C (Renewal and college credit for Primary A). 

c. Grammar A, B, and C (Renewal and college credit for Grammar A). 

2. College students seeking additional college credits. 

3. Holders of Class A Certificates desiring to work toward renewal of 

present certificates. 

4. Holders of any of the above-named certificates desiring to work for the 
bachelor's degree. 

5. Special Students: 

a. High school graduates desiring college credits. 

b. Students transferring from liberal arts colleges and desiring cer- 
tain required subjects obtainable in a teachers college. 

c. Students who need graduate school deficiencies removed. 

Pees and Expenses 

Registration fee $ 2.00 

Tuition ___ 30.00 

Board and lodging 45.00 

Library fee 1.00 

Custodial and service fee, nonboarders 4.00 

Late registration fee, payable after the first day_ 1.00 

Laboratory Fee, for each science course _ 2*. 00 

Pee for extra courses, per semester hour (Open only to those with 

prior high scholarship, and who maintain an average of B or above)- 5.00 

Pine Arts Fee, for each course 1.00 

Industrial Arts Pee, for each course 1.00 

Speech Laboratory Fee, for each course 1.00 

Graduation and Diploma Fee 10.00 

Supplies — 5.00 

Books... 15.00 

Students who take extra courses (more than six semester hours) during 
one session and fail to maintain the required average of B or above will 
receive credit for no more than six hours of work for that session. The fee 
for the extra courses will not be refunded. 

No personal checks accepted. Certified checks and money orders are accept- 
able substitutes for currency. 

There will be no reduction in board or lodging because of week end absences. 



48 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

REFUNDS 

Within ten days from date of entrance refunds of fees and charges will 
be made in proportion to the time spent at the College. However, regis- 
tration fees are non-refundable after a student completes registration. 
Except for service fee, room and board and payments for ensuing sessions, 
no fees are refundable to a student withdrawing later than ten days from 
date of entrance. Students who withdraw from the college without notice 
to or permission of college authorities may forfeit all refunds. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

When you come to Fayetteville to attend summer school be sure to bring 
with you: a record of your certificate name, number, and expiration date; 
all credit slips, transcripts and report cards of credits earned anywhere; 
and towels, pillows, bed linen, and toilet articles. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The bachelor's degree may be obtained by summer school study only, or 
by a combination of summer school study, extension courses, and study 
during the regular session, as well as by attendance upon the regular 
session, provided a high scholastic record is maintained and a balanced 
course of study is followed. 

Since September 1, 1947, the Class A Certificate may be obtained only by 
graduation from a standard college. 

Fayetteville State Teachers College is under the direct control of the State 
Department of Public Instruction. Its courses, regulations, fees and other 
requirements are all suggested or approved by the State authorities. 

To avoid duplicating courses previously taken, and to permit your credits 
to be properly evaluated if you are working for a degree, bring all your credit 
slips or transcripts of subjects previously taken. 

No changes in courses may be made without the prior consent of the 
Summer School Director. 

Persons desiring to attend the summer school should send in their applica- 
tions as soon as possible. Your application may be considered as accepted 
unless you hear from us to the contrary. 

Students should arrange to enter the first day, certainly no later than the 
third day, and should attend all regular class and chapel exercises. 



RESIDENCE AND CONDUCT 

Students not residents of Fayetteville, desiring to live off the campus, 
must write in advance for permission to live in an approved home. 

Students not yet in the teaching profession are under the same rules and 
regulations as during the regular session. 

Students who are in the teaching profession are expected to conduct them- 
selves as ladies and gentlemen, and in a manner to reflect credit upon Fayette- 
ville State Teachers College and upon the teaching profession. 



COURSES AND SUBJECTS 

The courses offered in the summer school are those required or recom- 
mended by the State Department, together with offerings from our own 
curricula. All courses count toward college graduation for those who have 
matriculated for the bachelor's degree. Courses should be chosen with the 
advice of the Director, and in compliance with the requirements for higher 
certificates and the bachelor's degree. Care must be exercised not to duplicate 
subjects taken previously. 



SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS SEEKING 

CERTIFICATION OR DEGREES WHOLLY OR 

PARTLY THROUGH SUMMER SCHOOL 

AND EXTENSION* 



CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS APPLYING TO IN-SERVICE 
TRAINING OP TEACHERS 

1. No teacher in service shall be given credit for more than twenty 
semester hoursf during any one year between September 1st of that year 
and August 31st of the following year. A teacher in service is defined as 
one who teaches six or more months during the period. This, it must be 
understood, is the maximum total credit from all sources. 

2. No teacher in service shall be given credit for more than twelve 
semester hours of extension class teaching or correspondence study in- 
struction in any year between September 1st of that year and August 31st 
of the following year, with not more than eight semester hours permitted 
between September 1st and June 1st following. 

3. Not more than forty per cent of the credit necessary to raise a certificate 
from one class to another may be earned through extension class teaching 
and/or correspondence study instruction. 

4. The original professional credit necessary for an administrative or 
supervisory certificate may not be secured through extension class teaching 
and/or correspondence study instruction. 

5. Credit for a total of not more than sixteen semester hours may be 
allowed for extension class work taken under the same instructor. 

6. Since September 1, 1947, the Class A Certificate built up from a lower 
grade certificate has been based upon a satisfactory completion of the require- 
ments for a degree from a standard college, along with, or in addition to. 
the specific certificate requirements. It is suggested that those teachers 
in service who have not qualified for the Class A Certificate arrange their 
program of studies in cooperation with the institution from which they would 
like to obtain the degree. 

7. Credits earned after September 1st will not be applied on a certificate 
for the school year 19 51-52 must be earned not later than September 2, 
1951. Institutions are urged to report the credit with the least possible 
delay after September 1st. 

*Some persons have already met portions of the requirements for certification or degrees 
given in this section. All who expect to get a degree from Fayetteville should have tran- 
scripts of all work done at other schools sent to Fayetteville State Teachers College, addressed 
to the Registrar. 

tA semester hour is equivalent to one and one-half quarter hours. 

Degree Requirements For Persons Who Have Done No Resi- 
dence Work In The Regular School Session and Hence Are 
Not Normal School Graduates 

Teachers of experience who are not normal school graduates may earn 
the bachelor's degree through summer school and extension under the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

1. Evidence of graduation from a four-year high school must be pre- 
sented. If the candidate is not a graduate of a four-year high school, 
the college work will be discounted on the basis of 4 hours of college 
work for each deficient high school unit. This work must be in the 
fields of the requirements for high school graduation. 



50 FAYBTTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

2. The first 60 semester hours of the candidate's work are accepted as 
being the equivalent of the first two years of college. 

3. Six 12-weeks sessions or twelve 6-weeks sessions of summer school 
must be secured after the first 60 semester hours of the candidate's 
college work have been earned. Extension may be substituted for 
some of this requirement. 

4. Not more than 25 per cent of the total college work may be taken in 
extension. 

5. The candidate must take three of the last four quarters (since May 
1937) in summer school or in a regular session at Fayetteville. 

6. An average of "C" ("82" in number grades) must be maintained in 
college work taken after high school graduation. 

7. To determine fulfillment of practice teaching requirements, the institu- 
tion may send one of its faculty members to observe the candidate's 
work in the field. If the candidate's work on his teaching job is up to 
the standard of the institution it will be accepted as fulfilling the prac- 
tice teaching requirements. 

8. In addition to the requirements of the State Department of Education 
for an A certificate, as of 1931, the following subjects must be taken 
as a part of the work: 

Advanced Composition 4 semester hrs. (At least 2 of these 

hours must be 

Biological Sciences 6 " " in speech) 

Physical Sciences 6 

Economics 4 " " 

Sociology 4 " " 

Philosophy of Education or 

Educational Sociology 2 " " 



Degree Requirements For Two-Year Standard Normal 
School Graduates 

Normal school graduates may earn the bachelor's degree during the regular 
session of by work in extension and summer school — under the following 
conditions: 

1. Two years or six quarters of work must be earned after normal school 
graduation. Twelve weeks of summer school constitute the summer 
quarter; therefore six 12-week sessions of summer school or 12 6-weeks 
sessions would fulfill this 2 year requirement. Extension work may 
be substituted for some of this requirement on the basis that six semes- 
ter hours of extension are equivalent to one 6-weeks session of summer 
school. 

(a) At least one year — or its equivalent in summer school — beyond 
normal school graduation must be spent at Fayettevile State Teach- 
ers College. 

2. If the degree is to be earned in summer school and extension, 36 semester 
hours of work must have been taken in summer school since May, 1937. 
These 36 hours may be earned in six 6-weeks sessions or three 12-weeks 
sessions of summer school. 

3. Not more than 25 per cent of the total college work since high school 
graduation may be taken in extension. 

4. Not more than 24 semester hours since normal school graduation may 
be taken in extension. 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 51 

An average of "C" ("82" in number grades) must be maintained in 
all work taken after normal school graduation. 

In addition to the requirements of the State Department of Education 
for an A certificate, the following subjects must be taken as a part of 
the work: 

Advanced Composition 4 semester hrs. (At least 2 of these 

hours must be 

Biological Sciences 6 " " in speech) 

Physical Sciences 6 " " 

Economics '. _ 4 " " 

Sociology 4 " " 

Philosophy of Education or 

Educational Sociology 2 " " 



WILMINGTON COLLEGE CENTER 

OF 

FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The Fayetteville State Teachers College conducts an off-campus College 
Center in Wilmington, North Carolina. The Center is operated in the build- 
ing of the Williston Industrial High School. The library and laboratory 
facilities of the High School are used by the Center. While the Center is 
conducted primarily to take care of the large number of veterans who would 
not otherwise be able to take college work, any student who is a graduate of 
an accredited high school may attend. 



STAFF 1951-1952 
J. H. Douglass Supervisor 

A.B., M.A., Fisk University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Fred J. Rogers Director 

A.B., Shaw University; further study: Pennsylvania State College and Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Annie C. King English 

A.B., Shaw University; M.A., North Carolina College at Durham. 

C. Howe McDonald .History 

B.S., Howard University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; further study: University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Booker T. Washington Physical Science 

A.B., Lincoln University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; further study: University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Lucille S. Williams English 

A.B., Shaw University; A.M., Columbia University; further study: Columbia University. 

Samuel J. Howie II Personal Hygiene 

B.S., Livingstone College; M.S. in Ed., Cornell University. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The statements and regulations printed in this catalog are based on 
practices in effect during the current school year and upon those anticipated 
for the succeeding school year. The College reserves the right to change 
regulations or policies governing admission, instruction, fees, graduation, 
or any other regulation or policy affecting students, whenever it is deemed 
advantageous to the welfare or progress of the institution to do so. Such 
changes shall become effective at whatever time is specified by the College 
authorities, and shall apply both to prospective students and to students 
already enrolled. 



ENROLLMENT 



1950 GRADUATES— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 



(*Completed Requirements in Summer School) 
(fGraduated with first honor) 
( {Graduated with second honor) 

Name Address 

Adams, Velma Arrnett Enfield 

Andrews, George William Lumberton 

Andrews, Resea Mae Council 

Armstrong, John W. Etowah, Tenn. 

* Armstrong, Leatha Dee H Rocky Mount 

* Arrington, John Xick Nashville 

/ Atkins, Willis McDougald Lillington 

Barnes, Thomas Theophus... .Lancaster, S. C. 

Battle, Mary Etta Rocky Mount 

Bellamy, James Clyde Richmond, Va. 

Bland, Gladys Theresa Sanford 

Bolton, Forrest Allene Semora 

Boone, Alean Murfreesboro 

* Brooks, Bertha Baldwin Fayetteville 

* Brown, Helen Ophelia Kinston 

Brown, Margaret Lucille Brooklyn, N. T. 

Brown, Ruby Queen Council 

Bryant, Ollie Louisa Castle Haynes 

* Bryant, Phrosenia Council 

Burden, Xellie Ellion Elizabethtown 

Burgess, Mary Butler Xew Tork, X. Y. 

* Burwell, Louise Henderson.. ..Clarksville, Va. 

* Cain, Ella Taylor Maxton 

Caldwell, Floyd William, Jr Fayetteville 

Carter, William A Mamaroneck, X. T. 

Chasten, Annie Ruth Rose Hill 

* Cobb, Constance Ewalda Cumnock 

/*Cobb, Cornelia Dockery Raleigh 

Coburn, George Ashley Parmele 

Council, Ophelia Shannon 

Crawley, Dorothy Laurann....So. Boston, Va. 

Cunningham, Ellaree Demetra Cramerton 

Cushenberry, Dorothy McLeod....Laurinburg 
f Cushenberry, Harold Leroy, Grindstone, Pa. 

Davis, Mary Irene Sutherlin, Va. 

Dawes, Cora Lee Macclesfield 

* Debnam, Jone H Wendell 

* Dickens, Thel.ma Weaver Pinetops 

* Diggs, Vivian Moore Sanford 

/*Drew, Avis Cordelia Saxe, Va. 

* Dublin, Olia Woods Smithfield 

Dunham, Dorothy McLaurin.... Elizabethtown 

Everett, Glotherine Wright Wilmington 

Faison, Colethia Mae Wilmington 

Flemming, Everett Augustus Cooleemee 

Gaines, John Hugh Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Gainey, Hazel Lee Fayetteville 

Gerald, Mary Aquilla Orrum 

* Gerald, Mollie Thelma Orrum 

Gilmore, Delilah Ernestine Semora 

* Gilmore, Ila M Lillington 



(/Graduated with honor) 
(xGraduated with Class of 1948) 
(zGraduated with Class of 1949) 

Name Address 

Gordon, Zebulon Vance, Jr Pinehurst 

Graham, Essie W Clinton 

* Grant, Pauline Murray Rocky Mount 

* Greene, Ludie Bullock Creedmoor 

* Halsey, Willie Mae J Wilmington 

* Hamilton, Gladys Marie Goldsboro 

Hankins, Gladys Alene Rocky Point 

Harrington, Roberta Vertrelle, Florence, S. C. 

* Harris, Beatrice Lorraine Plymouth 

* Harrison, Raymond B Xashville 

* Harrison, William James Rocky Mount 

* Hart, Georgia Idell Darlington, S. C. 

Hester, Hilda Smith Morehead City 

Hicks, George Albert Scottsburg, Va. 

* Hill, Albert Clinton, Jr Greenville 

Hill, Beulah Gray Tar Heel 

/ Hill, William Richard Fayetteville 

Hill, Wilma Marshall Washington, D. C. 

* Holden, Flora McBryde Dunn 

* Huggins, Dorothy Johnson Wilmington 

Ingram, Johnsie Cash Rockingham 

Isler, John Hugh Goldsboro 

Jackson, Doretha _ Fayetteville 

Jones, Isaiah Eliash Fayetteville 

Judah, Julia Phyllis Railway. X. J. 

Knight, Jetta Howard Tarboro 

Lawrence, Maudie Mae Chadbourn 

* Lawson, Mabel Braswell Rocky Mount 

* Leggett, Charlie Laurinburg 

Little, Annie Mae Wadesboro 

* Mallette, Hazel Lena Wilmington 

Mills, Samuel Xorris Xashville 

* Mitchell, Betsy Lou Clayton 

* Monroe, Pearlie Mae Laurinburg 

/*Morgan, Mabel Alexander Wilson 

Muldrow, Pauline Elizabeth Gable, S. C. 

/ Munn, Lottie M Lumberton 

Murphy, Bessie Madeline Ivanhoe 

* McBryde, Maggie Fayetteville 

* McCann, Annie Rose Hill 

/ McClenney, Madeline Lawrenceville. Va. 

McCown, June Rose South Boston, Va. 

McCurry, Thad Edward. ...Kansas City, Kan. 

* McDuffie, Ida S Fayetteville 

* McEachin, Peter Laurinburg 

McLaughlin, Gus Allen Durham 

McLean, Betty Ruth Smithfield 

x*McLeod, Maggie Bell Lumberton 

McMillan, Booker Taliaferro Fayetteville 

McMillan, Virginia Wilhelmina Supply 

McXair, William Russell Rockv Mount 



54 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Name Address 

* McNeill, Annye Ruth Fayetteville 

McNeill, Roy Lee Fayetteville 

* McSween, Alice Marston 

* Paige, Ruth Daniels Snow Hill 

Parker, Emmett Durham 

* Peacock, Edna Bernette Newton Grove 

Perkins, Gaither Thomas, New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Peterson, Eleanor E Rose Hill 

* Pierce, Louise Williams Wilmington 

z*Pierce, Mamie Handon Fayetteville 

* Pittman, Geneva Rocky Mount 

Powell, Henry N Hallboro 

* Pridgen, Ennie M. Goldsboro 

Reid, Mildred Luvenia Bennettsville, S. C. 

* Rhue, Edwin James Lillington 

/*Ricks, Hannah B ...Selma 

Sanders, Effie Dell Clayton 

Sanders, Mary Ellen Fayetteville 

* Sanford, Armelia Lillington 

Simmons, Lillian Estelle Fayetteville 

/*Singletary, Helen Evelyn Bladenboro 

* Smith, Gloria Josephine Laurinburg 

* Spaulding, Elizabeth Whiteville 

t Spruill, Herbert Kenneth Elmsford, X. Y. 

Starling, Eloise Raleigh 

* Stevens, Tobitha Ashford Faison 



Name Address 

* Stewart, Marian Louise Durham 

Sutton, Ethel Mae Kinston 

Taylor, Edward Nathaniel Fayetteville 

Terry, Essie Lee Ellerbe 

* Thomas, Capitalor Maureen Carthage 

* Thomas, Hazel Lee Louisburg 

* Turner, Emma Victoria Windsor 

* Tysor, Annie Scarlette Fayetteville 

* Underwood, Sallie Martin ..Goldsboro 

* Washington, Ethel Mae Sacramento, Cal. 

* Watson, Madge L Enfield 

White, Kenneth Cornell Wilmington 

Wiggs, Charles Spring Hope 

Williams, Alfenia LaVerne Wilmington 

Williams, Cornelius Currusso, Rocky Mount 

* Williams, Eleanor Mae Dunn 

Williams, Walter Samuel Navassa 

Williamson, Nellie Johnson Yanceyville 

* Wooten, Alexzena Kinston 

* Worsley, Randolph Rocky Mount 

Worthy, Pearlie Mae Wilson 

Wright, Adolphus Freeman Wilmington 

x*Wright, F. Elwood Fayetteville 

* Wright, Robbie Wesley Miami, Fla. 

Yarboro, Milton Jerome Fayetteville 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 



Anderson, Eleanor Whitfield Oxford 

Anderson, Ethel Mae Cross, S. C. 

Artis, Beatrice Manchester 

Baggett, Mamie Louise Fayetteville 

Baker, Cornelia Mae Raleigh 

Baldwin, Allie Mae Rockingham 

Battle, Dozella Scotland Neck 

Beebe, Clara Lee Fairmont 

Benjamin, Ruth Antionette Selma 

Black, Bessie Turner Clinton 

Black, Charles Anderson Lexington, Ky. 

Boone, Belvia Jonshia Roseboro 

Bostick, Jessie M Rockingham 

Boykins, Mamie Jane Wilmington 

Brown, Missouri Emily Woodsdale 

Burch, Eloise Wadesboro 

Burroughs, Burnette Amatha.. ..Richmond, Va. 

Burrows, Frances Nicholson Fayetteville 

Butts, Vanice Acme 

tCampbell, William Davis Lexington, Ky. 

Capel, Lillie Louise Candor 

Clyburn, Doretha Maxine Rocky Mount 

Clark, Mary Louise Scotland Neck 

Clemons, Onie Mae Wadesboro 

tCoachman, Isadora Williams Fayetteville 

Coachman, Warren Fayetteville 

Cobb, Susan Bash Fayetteville 



t Veteran 



Coleman, Virginia Dolichos E., Virgilina, Va. 

tDavis, Junior Fayetteville 

Davis, Rometta Bernice Nashville 

Davis, Rosa Lee Portsmouth, Va. 

Drake, Theresa B Kinston 

Dowe, Douglass Carl Salem, Va. 

Dowe, Rufus Shirley Salem, Va. 

Duck, Minnie Ruth Lumberton 

Edwards, Lottie Ruth Chesterfield, S. C. 

fFain, Sidney Aaron Knoxville, Tenn. 

Fleming, Anthony Morgan Fayetteville 

Frink, George W Bolivia 

fFrye, Bennie Watson Pinehurst 

George, Eunice Whiteville 

Graham, Maggie Rnthe Fayetteville 

Hannon, Grover Leon Rocky Mount 

Harris, Delores Wendell 

tHawkins, James LeRoy Fayetteville 

Hines, Florence E Sanford 

Hunter, Melvia Kathlyn Salem, Va. 

Johnson, George Alexander.. ..Red Hook, X. Y. 

Johnson, Miraetta Bellamy Wilmington 

Jones, Catherine Cornealus Millboro, Va. 

Jones, Henry Cleveland Spring Hope 

Jones, Ruby Lee Lynchburg, Va. 

Joyner, Evelyn Tarboro 

LaGrande, Eva Earnestine Roanoke, Va. 

tLane, James Edward Wilmington 

Lewis, Minnie Louise LaGrange 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



55 



Name Address 

tLide, William Walker Red Springs 

fLucas, Richard Ralph Spring Hope 

Lyons, Carrie Lee Whitakers 

Massey, Albert J Waxhaw 

Moore, Argie Lee Warsaw 

McCormick, Lessie Alpha Fayetteville 

fMcDonald, Hubert Fayetteville 

McKeithan, Wilma Eliza Wade 

McLaurin, Christine Fayetteville 

McLean, Mary Jeannette St. Pauls 

McLean, Nealie Bacote Parkton 

McRae, Sarah Inez Fayetteville 

Nathan, Ivory Lee Columbia, S. C. 

Palmer, Ethel Magnolia Halifax, Va. 

Parker, Dorah Elizabeth Fayetteville 

Parker, Nehemiah Elijah Richlands 

Peele, Coleen T Lewiston 

Pelham, James Alexander Richmond, Va. 

Pindle, Beatrice Williams Fayetteville 

fPolk, Eugene Marshville 

Pridgeon, Bessie Renee Goldsboro 

fRichardson, Charles Evans Lexington, Ky. 

Ricks, Agnes Alene Wilson 

Ricks, Mae D. Odell Wilson 

Robinson, Esther Mae Bladenboro 

Royster, Willie Virgilina, Va. 

Samuels, Byrdia Louise Fayetteville 

Saunders, Cora Elizabeth Oxford 



Name Address 

Saunders, Sarah Mae Greensboro 

Sellers, Mattie Bernice Wadesboro 

Simmons, Lucy M. Powell Clarkton 

Simmons, Thomas A New Rochelle, X. Y. 

Simons, Ethel Beatrice Wadesboro 

Smith, Jonathan Wilmington 

Smith, Mattie Ruth Scotland Neck 

Spencer, Cornelia T Wadesboro 

Stackhouse, Valeria Fairmont 

tSuggs, Sylvester Wesley Hookerton 

Swett, Lillie Lee Garysburg 

tTaylor, Willie Anthony ..Wilmington 

Thome, Lynwood Franklyn Fayetteville 

Tisdale, Mary E Salters, S. C. 

Tucker, Marie Ellen Halifax, Va. 

Venable, Rosa Townsville 

Vick, Alexander Rocky Mount 

Waddell, Alma Jane Armour 

tWallace, Andrew Allen Fayetteville 

Waller, Ada Henderson Norlina 

Washington, Mary Hubert Rock Hill, S. C. 

Whichard, Alice Ruth . Y Washington 

Wilkerson, Lewis Arleston Fayetteville 

Williams, Georgie Beatrice, Monrovia, Liberia 

Wilson, Mary Lily Shelby 

Wimbish, Emma Bell Henderson 

Witherspoon, Annie Mae Lancaster, S. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Arrington, Clifton Enfield 

Bell, Gaynelle ...Faison 

Bennitt, Alice Pearl Clinton 

Boone, Alice Mae Garysburg 

Butler, Lillie Mae Fayetteville 

Butts, Roxie Shelby 

Byers, Mae Norma Kings Mountain 

tCarrington, Henry Calvin.. ..South Boston, Va. 

Chestnutt, Marritt Marie Goldsboro 

Claiborne, Irene South Boston, Va. 

Clark, Mary Lee Clio, S. C. 

Costen, Smith Newark, N. J. 

Cox, Gerallene Vivian Pikeville 

Cunningham, P tyllis Alicia Florence, S. C. 

Cunningham, Ruth Helen Fayetteville 

Curry, Mildred Levy Fayetteville 

Davis, Bidddie Henderson 

Drake, Prince Samuel Lexington, Ky. 

Eargle, James Edward.. ..New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Ellerby, Wilhelmina Wilmington 

Elliott, Thelma Lynell Fayetteville 

Evans, Verniece ..Bolivia 

Faulk, Annie Beatrice Vass 

Faulkner, Alease Juanita Alton, Va. 

Fields, Inez Oxford 

Flagler, Lucille Alston Georgetown, S. C. 

Gadson, Annie Lee Kings Mountain 

Garrison, Dorothy Pauline Hampstead 



fVeteran 



Gore, Arminta Supply 

Graham, Irene Fair Bluff 

Hamer, Forrest T Chadbourn 

Hand, Lois Novella Burgaw 

Hand, Wilma Burgaw 

Hankins, Carolyn Elizabeth Supply 

Hardy, Myrtle H Enfield 

Harley, Edward Kurt New York, N. Y. 

Hart, Earna Mae Bear Creek 

Hayes, Betty Mae Franklinton 

Henderson, Edward Lee Lexington, Ky. 

Hickman, Mary Madgalene Bolivia 

Hicks, Hattie Ernestine Oxford 

Howard, Frank Foster Roseboro 

Hunter, Ernest Milton Rocky Mount 

Jeffries, Florence Burlington 

Johnson, Bessie Reed Morven 

Jones, Christine Guice Clinton 

Jones, Tryckateen Annette Warsaw 

Langston, Selma Irene Kinston 

Lewis, Marshall Rocky Mount 

Love, Hettie Lee Fairmont 

Lucas, Dorothy Spring Hope 

Mack, William G Lexington, Ky. 

Meadows, Mary Ellis Manson 

Mutts, Ethel Marian Scotland Neck 

McKnight, Vastie Gerelene Louisburg 

fMcMillan, Stanford Fayetteville 

McXair, Ruth Vernese Fayetteville 

McRae, Robert Wadesboro 



56 



FAYETTEVILLB STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Name Address 

Newton, Emma Frances Sanford 

Oakley, Willa Odessa Oxford 

Parker, Thelma Gray Fremont 

Parker, Theophilus Edenton 

Perry, Beatrice Castalia 

Powell, Doris Elizabeth Kinston 

Raynor, Mary Kate Mount Olive 

Reid, Juanita Frances Fayettevilie 

Rhem, Ella Milkins New Bern 

Robinson, Naomi Joyce Fayettevilie 

Robinson, Roberta Lee Saxe, Va. 

Robinson, Thelma Ruth Wilmington 

tSharpe, Malachi Fayettevilie 

Smalls, Robert Patrick....White Plains, N. Y. 
Smith, Odessa Lee Fayettevilie 



Name Address 

Sparrow, Joseph Covington, Va. 

Sparrow, Josephine Covington, Va. 

Stephens, Marie Selett Whiteville 

IStevens, Charles Arthur Wallace 

Stiff, June Marian Bedford, Va. 

Stokes, Annie Bell Wilmington 

Teachers, Eva Kate Wilmington 

Thames, Velma Juanita Fayettevilie 

Tucker, Lottie Mae Halifax, Va. 

Venable, Delia Valentine Saxe, Va. 

fWalker, James Arthur New Bern 

Wall, Irene Goldsboro 

Way, LeRoy Alexander East Orange, N. J. 

Yellowdy, Irene Malissa Kenly 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Aiken, Anne Carleen Wilmington 

Allen, Minnie Mary Rockingham 

Atkins, Marjorie Elizabeth, Manchester, N. H. 

Baird, Dorothy Irene Fayettevilie 

Baker, Rachel Elizabeth Wake Forest 

jBaldwin, Lera Douglas Lumber Bridge 

Baten, Cora Euizabeth Asheville 

Battle, Fannie Greene Rocky Mount 

Beatty, Alice Carol Willard 

tBell, Genesis Godwin 

Bellamy, Gladys Louise Wilmington 

Biggs, Erwin. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bradley, Woodrow Robert Fayettevilie 

Branch, Kermit Roosevelt Fayettevilie 

Bridgers, Dorothy Lee Tarboro 

Brown, John, Scott Englewood, N. J. 

Brown, Wandra Otelia Rose Hill 

Brown, William Dewey Council 

Bullock, Geraldine Norlina 

tBurney, Grover Nicholas Bolivia 

Butler, Ilia Claritha Clinton 

fButler, Jesse James Fayettevilie 

Campbell, Mattie Lee Clarkton 

Cannady, Bettie Van Henderson 

Capel, Golden Viola Candor 

Carroll, Carneil Stedman 

Christain, Florine Banks Richmond, Va. 

Cordon, Euverlene Jamesville 

Crawford, Vertie Ruth Lumberton 

Cunningham, Lowell Johnston, 

Jr Jersey City, N. J. 

fDavis, Bernard W Bladenboro 

Daye, Mary Elizabeth .....Virgilina, Va. 

Dowe, Alfred Thomas Salem, Va. 

Drew, Allen Wesley Windsor 

Dudley, Doris Snoria Grimesland 

Edgerton, L. Mae Montclair, N. J. 

Eggleston, Salona Edna Inez 

Elliott, Brenda Ethelene Dunn 

tElliott, Phillip Fayettevilie 

Ellis, Minnie Doris Wilson 

fVeteran 



Elmore, Thomas, Jr Rockford, 111. 

fFaison, James Lee Goldsboro 

tFaison, James Manuel, Jr Fayettevilie 

Farmer, Levolyre Costella Wilson 

Fennell, Nancy Lee Rose Hill 

fFitzpatrick, George Thomas Fayettevilie 

Flowers, Lynwood T Southern Pines 

Ford, Geneva Fairmont 

Ford, Ruth Fairmont 

Fulmore, Rosezella Fairmont 

Funderburk, Floretha Cheraw, S. C. 

Gainey, Marian Leigh Fayettevilie 

Garris, Helen Marie Roanoke Rapids 

Glenn, Gladys Lucretia Lumber Bridge 

Gore, Earlie E Supply 

Hart, Janie Otelia Whitakers 

Hawkins, Myrtle Virginia Kittrell 

Hogans, Florence Arlene Goldsboro 

Hooker, Tessie Lee Sanford 

Horton, Jessie Mae Kenly 

Howell, Rosa Virginia Robersonville 

Hudgins, Winfred Pleasant ...South Hill, Va. 

Humphrey, Emma Lue Jacksonville 

Hunter, Amelia McLester Whitakers 

Jackson, Lawrence Fayettevilie 

Johns, Emma Lee Spence Fuquay Springs 

Johnson, Alice Virginia Davenport, Fla. 

Johnson, Edward Taylor Lexington, Ky. 

Johnson, Gracie Mae Wilmington 

Johnson, Marzella Mae LaGrange 

Jones, Allie C , Fayettevilie 

Kimber, Geneva Reidsville 

Larkin, Ruby Vernette Teachey 

Leak, Essie Melvin Rockingham 

Leaphart, Arbrey Elizabeth Rocky Mount 

Lewis, Walter E Rutherford, N. J. 

Moore, Aquila Eugene Clarkton 

Moore, Mary Christeen Roseboro 

Morgan, Frances Marion Smithfield 

Munn, Estella Louise Lumberton 

McAllister, Estelle Fayettevilie 

McClelland, Pansy Lenora Laurinburg 

McClure, Barbara Ann Winston-Salem 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



57 



Name Address 

McDonald, Bessie Janie Parkton 

McGregor, Helena Raeford 

Mclntyre, Dessie Barbara Rocky Point 

tMdntyre, Sylvester Fayetteville 

McKinnon, Emm Fayetteville 

McKoy, Eunice Erwin 

McNair, Hattie Narcissus Manchester 

Palmer, Cedella Joan Goldston 

Parker, Ada Bowser Fayetteville 

Parker, Ernestine Rhoena Richlands 

Penn, Marcus Quinton Roanoke, Va. 

Pitt, Queen Esther Pinetops 

Pollard, Raymond J Kerr 

Porter, Rosa Ann Fayetteville 

Randolph, Jean Elizabeth Scotland Neck 

Rice, Doris Sabrena Asheville 

Ricketts, Beretta Elizabeth Hamlet 

Roberson, Berdie Reid Greenville 

Rogers, Donnell Oxford 

Ross, Ceasar Charley Warrington, Fla. 

Rountree, Fannie Doris Wilson 

Royal, Sula Ruth Clinton 

Russell, Josephine Raleigh 

Simpson, Gladys Mae Acme 

Smith, Delia Mae Wilson Mills 

Smith, Edward John, Jr Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



Name Address 

Smith, Grace Olivia Rocky Mount 

Smith, Helen Margie Anna Badin 

Solomon, Marion Yerdelle Smithfleld 

Stevens, Gerdine Teachey 

Stevens, Thelma Mae Clayton 

Swann, Tommie Bell Sanford 

Thompson, Helen Ruth McDonald 

Townsend, Ruth Anderson Cross, S. C. 

Troy, Eloise Clarkton 

fTruitt, Fred Limmie Fayetteville 

Waddell, Larry Dougles Fayetteville 

Wade, Otelia Veronica Enfield 

Wallace, Hattie Mae Ola White Rose Hill 

Warren, Emma Lee Zebulon 

Warren, Ruth Taylor Clinton 

Wiley, Charles Newark, N. J. 

Wilkins, Hilda Jane Nashville 

Williams, Doris Delores Wilson 

Williams, Franklin Monroe Orrum 

Williams, Hattie Four Oaks 

Williams, James Arthur Fayetteville 

Williams, Lillie Mosie Edwards.... Walstonburg 

Wilson, Ophelia Gladys New London 

Winchester, Beatrice Mary Lee Monroe 

Yelverton, Wilhelmina Goldsboro 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aldridge, Doris Elizabeth LaGrange 

Alston, Doris Yerlene Franklinton 

Alston, Roger Warrenton 

Anderson, Arthur Lee Lampasas, Texas 

Anderson, Josiephyne Ann Fayetteville 

Arnette, Cora Lee Fairmont 

Baldwin, Arthur Goldsboro 

Barnes, Irene Dunn 

Barnes, Katie Chestnut Wilson 

Barnes, Vernestine Walstonburg 

Baten, James Roosevelt Asheville 

Battle, Mary Ethel Rocky Mount 

Batts, Wilma Gladys Rose Hill 

Beatty, Robert Louis Willard 

Becton, Yelma Marie New Bern 

Bell, Emma Margrett Clinton 

Bellamy, Jessie Lee Tarboro 

Bennitt, Lucille Delores Clinton 

Berkeley, Charles Vernon, New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Best, Hazel Lee Pikeville 

Bethea, Thomasena Olivia Dillon, S. C. 

Beveney, Maurice Eugene, Washington, D. C. 

Blanks, Arlene Acme 

Blount, Iris Lynette Smithfleld, Va. 

fBobbitt, Henry Hudson Fayetteville 

Boddie, Etta Robinson Newport News, Va. 

Bonner, Ted Roosevelt Newark, N. J. 

Bowen, Julia P Acme 

Boyd, James Marvin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Boyd, Virginia Lewis Elberon 



tVeteran 



Boykin, Lucy Wilson 

Bradley, Corene Hope Stedman 

Briley, Evelyn Marie Robersonville 

Brinkley, Catherleen Bertha Fayetteville 

Brinson, Matthew Merrian Rose Hill 

Broadhurst, Wayne Kennon Goldsboro 

Bronson, Clara Mae Turkey 

Brooks, Lucinda Claudetta Roxboro 

Brown, Alfonze Shannon 

Bruton, Johnnie Mae Kinston 

Buchanan, Charles Ellsworth, New York, N.Y. 

Bullock, Helen Odella Battleboro 

Bullock, Marian Dansy Tarboro 

Bunch, Addie Louise Washington 

Burgess, Dorothy Mae Jacksonville 

Burns, Margaret Lee Ansonville 

Burton, Thomas Edward Hartwell, Ga. 

Butler, Joseph William Washington, D. C. 

Cagle, Charles Daniel Biscoe 

Callender, Connie Mae Clifton Forge, Va. 

Campbell, Jennie J. Lee Richmond, Va. 

tCarlton, Alonza Reed... Turkey 

Carr, Eunice Mae Rose Hill 

. Carr, Hermenia Lynette Rose Hili 

Carr, Willie Loviet Wilson 

Chalmers, Estelle Cameron 

Chaplin, Alva Jane Frogmore, S. C. 

Charity, Melvin Alexander, Washington, D. C. 

Clay, Berrye Roberta Woodsdale 

Coats, Howard Ellis Greenwood, S. C. 

Coburn, Elizabeth Rae Parmele 

Copeland, Rena Lumberton 



58 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Name Address 

Cotton, John Henry Wilson 

Covington, Annie Lois Gibson 

Cox, Grace Denise Newton Grove 

Craddock, Hazel Clemintine Faison 

Crawford, Gertrude Marie Fairmont 

Cunningham, Curtis Ross. ...South Boston, Va. 
Currie, Grace Evelyn Rockflsh 

tCurrie, Herman Fayetteville 

Cyrus, Leconus Albertson 

Dargan, Katie Louise Wadesboro 

Davis, Etta Rose Ansonville 

Davis, Frank Estill Lexington, Ky. 

Davis, Marian Louise Red Oak, Va. 

Delaney, Joyce Allegra Wilson 

Dew, Artheneus Wilson 

Dew, James Wilson 

Dickens, Hattie Mae Jackson 

Drakeford, Willie Edward Bethune, S. C. 

Drew, Hilda Maggeline Jackson 

Dunham, James Frederick Elizabethtown 

Dunham, Luzetta Gresham, S. C. 

Dunn, Ha Kay Rocky Mount 

Echols, Thressa Lorraine Willard 

Edmonds, Theretha Tillery 

Edwards, Lillian Irene Faison 

Edwards, Mirrian Stantonsburg 

Ellis, Doris Elizabeth Whiteville 

Evans, Mabel B. Melvin Fayetteville 

Everette, Marie Wilson 

Everette, Nita Pearl Lake Landing 

Exum, Raymond Lee Fremont 

Fairley, Margaret Wagram 

tFarmer, Edgar Fayetteville 

Farmer, Mattie Lee Rocky Mount 

Farrish, Marvelean Ruth Roxboro 

tFaulk, Henry Collins Fayetteville 

Felton, Bettie Lee Colerain 

Fisher, William Douglas. ..Washington, D. C. 

Fleming, Bettye Rose Pinehurst 

Ford, Harold Leon Laurinburg 

Forney, Fannye Louise Lincolnton 

Francis, Gloria Jean Burleigh, N. J. 

Frederick, Vernice J Warsaw 

Freeman, Elsie Louise Hallsboro 

Garland, John Thomas Memaroneek, N. Y. 

Gaylord, Doris Diana Wilson 

Gaynor, Samuel Dennison Rockford, 111. 

Golden, Bobbie David Supply 

Graham, Annie Doris Rose Hill 

Grant, Clemetine Jackson 

Green, Helen Dezel Fremont 

Griffin, E'Lizabeth Ann Fairmont 

Grimes, Howard Hunter Lexington, Ky. 

Griswold, Cleopatra Raleigh 

Hariston, Howard Lee Martinsville, Va. 

Hamilton, Kirby Lee Goldsboro 

Hand, Bettye Jean Belmont 

Hargrove, Martha Mae Clarksville, Va. 

Harris, John Ervin Oxford 



t Veteran 



Name Address 

Harris, Joyce Ann Lillington 

Hester, Patricia Louise Morehead City 

tHicks, James Otis Broadway 

Hill, Arlene Clementene Warsaw 

tHill, Clarence Henry Warsaw 

Hines, Ethel Ruth Pinetops 

Hinton, Cebrittia Carter Raleigh 

Hobbs, Etta Mae Wilson 

Hogans, Theresa Iva Goldsboro 

Hollingsworth, Arrie Lee Willard 

Hooker, Norma Virginia Sanford 

Hooks, Careleigh Washington, D. C. 

Home, Dorothy Virginia Saratoga 

Horton, Ina Mae Battleboro 

tHostler, Claude Fayetteville 

Howell, Mallie Grace Stantonsburg 

Hughes, Ina Pearl Cheraw, S. C. 

Hughes, James Lawrence, Jr Fayetteville 

Hurst, Johnell Elva Swansboro 

Jackson, Douglas Williamsburg, Va. 

Jackson, Milton James Goldsboro 

Jackson, Willie Otis Vidalia, Ga. 

Jacobs, Olena Rich Square 

Jenkins, Fannie E Colerain 

Jenkins, Pearlie Beatrice Lancaster, S. C. 

Johnson, Alberta Ivernell Fayetteville 

Johnson, Isaac Kerr 

Johnson, Jonas Castleman Morehead City 

Jones, Enzie Ezekiel Fayetteville 

Jones, Lutelle Pantego 

Jones, Pecolia Fayetteville 

Jones, William Augustus Lexington, Ky. 

Judkins, Joanne Adella Clayton 

Killian, James Clinton Hickory 

tKing, Harvey L Mount Olive 

tKing, Wilbert Douglas Overhills 

Knight, Rosezena Scotland Neck 

Koonce, Eunice Leola Trenton 

Lacewell, Jessie Acme 

Lane, Reval Alcinia Goldston 

Langford, Ida Leola Potecasi 

Leak, Mildred Gibson 

Leake, Auley Ross, Jr Mount Gilead 

Lee, Freddie Leroy Clinton 

Lennon, Gladys Boardman 

Lewis, Ethel Juanita East Orange, N. J. 

Lewis, Gladys, Lydia Rock Hill, S. C. 

Lewis, Gertrude Goldsboro 

Liggins, Alphonzo 

Raymond Washington, D. C. 

Little, Dorothy Lee Ruby, S. C. 

Lloyd, James Thirston Council 

Locus, Curtis Lee Fremont 

Lunsford, Gladys Arnetia Rocky Mount 

Maddox, Carrie Mae Shelby 

Marrow, Pheobe Oxford 

Marsh, Hattie Joan Morven 

Marsh, Mary Ruth Marshville 

Mathis, Catherine Faison 

Matthews, Willie Fayetteville 

tMaynor, Ernest Kyles Fayetteville 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



59 



Name Address 
Miller, Arletha Erwin 

tMiller, Solomon Albert Mount Olive 

Mills, Clara Helen Nashville 

Moore, Annie Ruth Stedman 

Moore, Helen Strange Fayetteville 

Moore, Sallie Lucille Bayboro 

Morning, Swanola Marie Bethel 

Morris, Carol Elizabeth Jackson 

McArthur, Annie Reed Vass 

McArthur, David Earl Fayetteville 

McCargo, Rose Lena Stone Harbor, N. J. 

McClain, Tabitha Elizabethtown 

McDonald, Evelyn Elizabeth Parkton 

McEachern, Lubertha Fayetteville 

McEachin, Jessie Belle Laurinburg 

McEachin, Ruth Red Springs 

Mcintosh, George Cleveland Raeford 

Mcintosh, Walter Lynell Fas'etteville 

McLaughlin, Verdell Tiney Maxton 

McLaurin, Sarah Elizabeth Maxton 

McLean, Susie Cathrine Parkton 

McMillan, Bertha Lee Gerald Fayetteville 

tMcXair, William Edward Fayetteville 

McNeil, Joseph Rudolph Fayetteville 

McNeill, Fleecie Ree Wade 

McQueary, Harrison, Jr Lexington, Ky. 

McRae, Eloise Deanna Hamer, S. C. 

Nowlin, Rolan Alphonso Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Oden, Doris Lucille Beaufort 

Oliver, Robert L. P Alton, Ya. 

O'Neal, Bernice Elizabeth. ...Society Hill, S. C. 

Owens, Alma Roberta Beatice, Ala. 

Owen, Katie West Halifax, Ya. 

Palmer, Mary Alice , Sanford 

Parnell, Ruth Alexandria Rowland 

Peebles, Mattie Lee Jackson 

Pender, Luvenia Wilson 

Penny, Ruby Mae Clayton 

Perry, Gracie Ann Rich Square 

Perry, Frances Olivia Sanford 

Phillips, Robert Lee Battleboro 

Pitt, Naomi Angelyn Bethel 

Porter, Isabelle Flora Fayetteville 

Powell, Dorothy Mae Rich Square 

Powell, Ruby Delores Apex 

Price, Rosetta Leaksville 

Pridgen, Doris Leigh Whiteville 

Rankin, Christopher Columbus Hickory 

Reeves, Jessie Lee Wilson 

Roberson, Hilda Rae Robersonville 

Rodgers, Gloria Swanson Williamston 

Rollins, Jerome Leonard.. ..Washington, D. C. 

Russell, Fannye Wees Manson 

Russell, Marie Yirginia Hendersonville 

Sabbs, Frederick Joseph Washington, D. C. 

Samuel, Lillie B Elizabethtown 

Sanders, Hannah Selma 

Sanders, Helen Maxine Smithfleld 

Sanford, Rebecca Artense Lillington 



fVeteran 



Name Address 

Satterfield, Oveta : Durham 

Scott, Louis Joseph Washington, D. C. 

Scott, Major Robert Lexington, Ky. 

Sharpless, Arlene Chinquapin 

Shaw, Armetro Whiteville 

Shepherd, Yernell Seaboard 

Simons, Dorothy Wadesboro 

tSimpson, James Robert Fayetteville 

Sinclair, Leola Lee Lumberton 

Slade, Lola Mae Williamston 

Smallwood, Bessie Ruth Colerain 

Smith, Anna Jane Wendell 

Smith, Carrie Beatrice Red Oak, Ya. 

Smith, Joseph Lee Lexington, Ky. 

Smith, Milton Maceo Fairmont 

Solomon, Nevy Moud Essex 

Solomon, Ruth Mae Kinston 

Sparrow, Bessie Isabelle Covington, Ya. 

Spearman, Edna Eugenia Rose Hill 

Spence, Glenora Shirley Fuquay Springs 

Stanley, Allison _ Trafford, Pa. 

Stephens, Gwendolyn Yerdel Lumberton 

Sutton, Lillie Mae Wilmington 

Sutton, Mable Grace Goldsboro 

Swinson, DeLacy Loretha Goldsboro 

Taylor, Cacelia Mae Aberdeen 

Taylor, Mable Geneva Kittrell 

Thomas, Goldia Jacquline Boardman 

Thorpe, Martha Olivia Tarboro 

Toliver, Fred Lee Churchland, Ya. 

Tucker, Mary Elizabeth Macclesfield 

Turnage, Lenora Enfield 

Turner, Andrew Delano, Jr. Washington, D. C. 

Turner, Hellon Marie Goldston 

Yailes, Barbara Jean Goldsboro 

Yailes, Bernice Goldsboro 

Wall, Annie Belle Wilmington 

Walls, Bessie Mae Bennettsville, S. C. 

Ward, Ruby Nacoma Wilson 

Watson, Aileen Carmilla Shelby 

Watson, Mattie Lee Warrenton 

White, Ethelrene Tabor City 

White, Leon Youngsville 

White, Jamie Charles Youngsville 

Whitfield, Floretta Chocowinity 

Whitt, Ester Estelle Woodsdale 

Whittington, Lucile Martha Hamer, S. C. 

Wilder, Doretha Youngsville 

tWilkins, Albert James Fayetteville 

Williams, Adelaide Raeford Fayetteville 

Williams, Cliffornia Mount Olive 

Williams, David Stamson, Jr Smithfleld 

Williams, Etta Laurine Chadbourn 

Williams, F. L Fayetteville 

Williams, Gloria Predethea Warsaw 

tWilliams, Leroy Fayetteville 

Williams, Marion Macon, Ga. 

Williams, Rosaline Smithfleld 

Williams, Sam Frederick Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wilson, Freeda Olivia Northell Raleigh 

Wilson, Lula Yennie Kings Mountain 



60 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Name Address 

Wilson, Roland Percival... .Washington, D. C. 

Winbush, Leroy Newark, N. J. 

Windley, Jerry Augustus Portsmouth, Va. 

Woodard, Lorraine Yvonne Wilson 

Wright, Abraham Fayetteville 



Name Address 

Wright, James Ketter Fayetteville 

tWright, Norman P Fayetteville 

Yancey, Vannie Elnora Roxboro 

Young, Augustus Thomas Lexington, Ky. 



SPECIAL 



Campbell, Mary Rosa Fayetteville 

tDaniels, Charles Russell, Jr Greenville 

Gaskins, Rosa Lee New Bern 

Hollingsworth, Dorothy Mae Fayetteville 

Jackson, Richard William Delaware, Ohio 

Kennard, Clyde Hattiesburg, Miss. 



Molark, John Richard Denver, Col. 

Mumford, Lillian Bayboro 

Pinchback, Agnes Moffitt Richmond, Va. 

Reid, Milton Anninias .....Norfolk, "Va. 

Scott, Olive Williams Fayetteville 

Whitaker, Kathryn Whitakers 



EVENING SCHOOL 



Baldwin, Lessie Odell Fayetteville 

Beaufort, Inez Aery Fayetteville 

Beaufort, Virginia Dare Fayetteville 

Dobbins, Bonzie Bonnie Raeford 

Evans, Annie Mae Fayetteville 

Ewing, Nelia Clark Fayetteville 

Harvey, Ethel Blanche Fayetteville 

Kittrell, Josephine C Red Springs 

Leake, Mollie Victoria Red Springs 



Mitchell, Mary Williams Fayetteville 

Moore, Ola B. Spaulding Whiteville 

Morrisey, Eva Mae Clinton 

McKay, Mary Paige Fayetteville 

Raiford, Ethel M Fayetteville 

Ray, Lucille F..". Fayetteville 

Robinson, David Lewis Clinton 

Webb, Katie M Fayetteville 

Wood, Louretta McNeill Fayetteville 



SUMMER SCHOOL— 1950 



Aldridge, Ida Evans Goldsboro 

Andrews, Mattie Melvin Fayetteville 

Armwood, Consuella Mount Olive 

Atkins, Jarrette Cortez....Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Baggett, Mamie Louise Fayetteville 

Baldwin, Allie M Rockingham 

fBanks, Albert A Fayetteville 

Battle, Benjamin C Rocky Mount 

Beatty, Alice Willard 

Bell, Gaynelle Faison 

Bland, Eva M Sanford 

Blackmore, Rossie Warsaw 

tBobbitt, Henry Hudson Fayetteville 

Boney, Bertha M. Carr Rose Hill 

Boney, Juanita B Rose Hill 

Boone, Belvia J Roseboro 

Bostick, Jessie Rockingham 

Brewer, Desseyra Rich Square 

Briley, Maggie Faithful Tarboro 

Brown, Addie Luvenia Bell Fayetteville 

Brown, Evelena Council 

Brown, Mamie Ruth Wilmington 

Brown, Melonie Margaret Fayetteville 

Brown, Missouri Emily Woodsdale 

Bryan, Alice Smith Lumberton 

Bryant, Annie F. H Mount Olive 

Bryant, Daisy Brown Wilmington 

Bullock, Bertha Enfield 

Burroughs, Burnette Amatha, Richmond, Va. 
Burrows, Frances E. N Fayetteville 



tVeteran 



Butts, Roxie Shelby 

Butts, Vanice Acme 

Campbell, Viola Beatrice Whiteville 

Campbell, Wesley Maxton 

fCampbell, William Davis Lexington, Ky. 

Capel, Lillie Louise Candor 

tCarrington, Henry Calvin, South Boston, Va. 

Claigg, Annie Marie Fuquay Springs 

Clark, Earthalane Smith Lillington 

Clark, Mary Louise Scotland Neck 

Clark, Mittie R Fayetteville 

Coachman, Isadora Williams Fayetteville 

fCoachman, Warren L Fayetteville 

Cole, Ruth Aleane Goldsboro 

Coleman, Virginia Dolichos E., Virgilina, Va. 

Comerford, Etrula A. Melvin Fayetteville 

Council, Mary Geraldine Truesdell, White Oak 

Cox, Gerallene Vivian Pikeville 

Crawford, Amy Cornelia Lumberton 

Crittenden, Vesta Canady Midway Park 

tDafford, Jessie B Rose Hill 

tDaniels, Charles Russell, Jr Greenville 

Dargan, Vashti Brewer Mt. Croghan, S. C. 

Darlington, Charles A Washington, D. C. 

Davenport, Vivian Moore Clarkton 

Davis, Enolia M Macon 

tDavis, Junior Fayetteville 

Davis, Rometta Bernice Nashville 

Davis, Rosa Lee Portsmouth, Va. 

Daye, Mary Elizabeth Virgilina, Va. 

Days, Richard Adam Flint, Mich. 

Dean, Rachel Holden Lillington 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



61 



Name Address 

DeBerry, Corine Dorothy Troy 

DeBrew, Annie Mae Lyons Scotland Neck 

Douglas, Inez Highland Hamlet 

Douglass, Katherine 

Elizabeth Englewood N. J. 

Douglass, Mabel Cummings Fayetteville 

Drake, Parris W Fayetteville 

Drake, Quessie Anders Fayetteville 

tDunn, Joseph William Wake Forest 

Eargle, James Edward New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Echols, Thressa Lorraine Willard 

Edwards, Lottie Ruth Chesterfield, S. C. 

Elliott, Thelma Lynell Fayetteville 

Ellis, Mable Aletha LaGrange 

Evans, James Jackson Fayetteville 

Evans, Mabel Melvin Fayetteville 

Evans, Susie Estell Fayetteville 

Evans, Willie A Fayetteville 

fFain, Sidney Aaron Knoxville, Tenn. 

fFaison, James Lee Goldsboro 

tFaison, James Manuel, Jr Fayetteville 

Faison, Mamie M. C Clinton 

Faulkner, Alease Juanita Alton, Va. 

Fennell, Isabelle Burgaw 

Fields, Frances Everett Whaleyville, Ya. 

Fisher, Ruby Morris Fayetteville 

tFitzpatrick, George Thomas Dunn 

Fleming, Annie B Parkersburg 

Fleming, Anthony Morgan Fayetteville 

Flowers, Lynwood Taussaunt.. Southern Pines 

Ford, Mildred Ann Fairmont 

Frasier, Hallie M. Josie....Bennettsville, S. C. 

fFrye, Bennie Watson Pinehurst 

Funderburke, Helena Ruth Cheraw, S. C. 

Galloway, Lattie S Winnabow 

Garris, Helen Marie Roanoke Rapids 

Gibson, Rozella James Fayetteville 

Gilmore, Bernice Hawkins Maxton 

Gilmore, Edith Clark Fayetteville 

Graham, Arletha Butler Clinton 

Graham, Clara E. Bryant Fair Bluff 

Graham, Pummie Stanford Magnolia 

Green, Katie Zepora Hamlet 

Gregory, Alice D Summerville, S. C. 

Groton, Henry K Fayetteville 

Haile, George W., Jr Fayetteville 

Haithman, Chatricks McDowell. ...Fayetteville 

Haithman, LaYon McDowell Fayetteville 

Hamer, Forrest Theophilus Chadbourn 

Hand, Wilma Burgaw 

Hankins, Faldenia M Wilmington 

tHardison, Eugene Fayetteville 

Hardy, Myrtle Enfield 

Harrell, Hollie St. Pauls 

Harrington, Janie Dunn Red Springs 

Harris, Delores Wendell 

Hawkins, Esther Yirginia Maxton 

fHawkins, Malcolm Providence, R. I. 

Hawkins, Myrtle Yirginia Kittrell 



tVeteran 



Name Address 

Herring, Hazel Lee Clinton 

Hightower, Mary L. Raye Fayetteville 

Hines, Ethel Ruth Pinetops 

Hodges, Mary Ruth Whiteville 

Hogans, Alice Sykes Goldsboro 

Houston, Blanche Wall Hamlet 

Howard, Frank Foster Roseboro 

Howell, Carrie S Rocky Mount 

Hull, Rita Spicer Rocky Mount 

Ireland, Maggie Elizabeth Faison 

James, Maggie S Maple Hill 

Johnson, Lillian D Rose Hill 

Johnson, Omega Foster Laurinburg 

Johnson, Bessie Watson Roanoke Rapids 

Jones, Allie C Fayetteville 

Jones, Ida Mae Halifax 

Jones, Thelma Blackman... Fayetteville 

Joyner, Evelyn Tarboro 

tLane, James Edward Wilmington 

Lassiter, Clara Watson Selma 

Lavender, Daisy Lee Jacksonville 

Lawrence, Addie A Tarboro 

Leak, Mildred Gibson 

Leak, Mildred L Maxton 

Lee, Lula B Clinton 

Lewis, Essie M Elizabethtown 

Lewis, Flora Crawford Mount Gilead 

Lewis, Marcus Ernest Mount Gilead 

Lewis, Minnie Louise LaGrange 

Lockamy, Mattie Margaret H Fayetteville 

Lucas, Andrew Hamlet 

Lucas, Maggie Ratliff Laurinburg 

Maddox, Carrie Mae Shelby 

Manning Xapoleon Baltimore, Md. 

Marsh, Lettie M Wilmington 

Matthews, Hattie B Clinton 

Maxwell, Louise E Charleston, S. C. 

Melvin, Mae Bullard Roseboro 

Merritt, Lillie Best Clinton 

Miller, Lue Dinah Hall Magnolia 

Mitchell, Alice B. Wilson 

Monk, Marie A Magnolia 

Monroe, Yiola D Fayetteville 

Moore, Celia Jenkins Clarkton 

fMoore, George A Fayetteville 

Moore, Henrietta Fayetteville 

Moore, Lila Curby Clinton 

Morris, Carol Elizabeth Jackson 

Morrisey, Katie B Clinton 

Morse, Edna West Southern Pines 

Mosley, Lillie M. Lanier Kinston 

Murphy, Bertha West Wallace 

Murphy, Elnora Hamilton Goldsboro 

Murphy, Helen Pollocks ville 

Murray, Fitzhugh Hiley Teachey 

McAllister, Estelle Fayetteville 

McCall, Maggie Lomax Bennettsville, S. C. 

McCallum, Wilhelmina Powell Maxton 

McDonald, Bessie Janie Parkton 

McDonald, Clarence Fayetteville 

tMcDonald, Hubert Fayetteville 



62 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Name Address 

tMcDonald, Joseph Fayetteville 

McDowell, Georgia K Elizabethtown 

McGrier, Cornelia Warwick Macon 

tMdntyre, Sylvester V Fayetteville 

McKeathen, Ella Evans Columbia 

McKoy, Hattie Fayetteville 

McKoy, Marian Thome Fayetteville 

McLaughlin, Minnie Fayetteville 

McLaurin, Christine Fayetteville 

McLaurin, James Frank Elizabethtown 

McLean, Mary Jeannette St. Pauls 

McLean, Nealie Bacote Parkton 

McMillan, Carrie R. Sinclair Lumberton 

McMillan, Gladys Gertrude Fayetteville 

McNeill, Inez Lumberton 

McNeill, Mable Cerro Gordo 

McNeill, Rose Crumpler Fayetteville 

McQueen, Rhunetta Wilder Cheraw, S. C. 

McRae, Kazee Caple Maxton 

Nathan, Ivory Lee Columbia, S. C. 

Newkirk, Allie Carlton Rose Hill 

Newton, Emma Frances Sanford 

Oliver, Ruth Nicholson Fayetteville 

Palmer, Cedella Joan Goldston 

Palmer, Ethel Magnolia Halifax, Va. 

Parker, Dorah S Fayetteville 

Parker, Nehemiah, Elijah Richlands 

Patterson, Roberta Benjamin Faison 

Payne, Lucile P Washington, D. C. 

tPenix, John A Raleigh 

Penny, Logan Rocky Mount 

Perry, Sudie Powell Elizabethtown 

Peterson, George Franklin Clinton 

Phillips, Robert Lee Battleboro 

Pindle, Beatrice Williams Fayetteville 

Pigford, Pauline Magnolia 

Pollard, Raymond J : Kerr 

Pope, Mamie Knucles Lumberton 

Powe, Annie Davis Cheraw, S. C. 

Powe, Idell Yvonne Cheraw, S. C. 

Powe, Oralee Samuel Cheraw, S. C. 

Powell, Lucy Mae Clarkton 

Powell, Mattie Louise Whiteville 

Quick, Beulah Melchor Fayetteville 

Raiford, Ethel Mumford Fayetteville 

Randolph, Jean Elizabeth Scotland Neck 

Raye, James Arthur Fayetteville 

Reid, Dewitt Robert Charlotte 

Reid, Mary E. G Wilson 

Rennick, Minnie Cole Wadesboro 

Rice, Doris Sabrena Asheville 

tRichardson, Charles Evans Lexington, Ky. 

Ricks, Mae D. Odell Wilson 

Robinson, Daisy C Fayetteville 

Robinson, Hiawatha Woodro Hamlet 

Robinson, Mattie Bell Wilmington 

Ross, Ceasar Charley Warrington, Fla. 

Ruffin, Pearl Moore Lumberton 

Sampson, Annie C Clinton 



(•Veteran 



Name Address 

Samuels, Byrdia Louise Fayetteville 

Saunders, Cora Elizabeth Oxford 

Saunders, Sarah Mae Greensboro 

Sawyer, Carrie C Rockingham 

Scott, Cherry Beatrice Parker Fayetteville 

Segar, Margaret Wilmington 

t Sharp, Malachi Fayetteville 

Shaw, Armetro Whiteville 

Shaw, Sadie B Whiteville 

Shipman, Hancie Mae Maxton 

tSimmons, Ernest G Fayetteville 

Simons, Ethel Beatrice Wadesboro 

tSimpson, James Robert Fayetteville 

Smalls, Irone Frederick Greensboro 

Smith, Edward John, Jr Mamaroneck, N. T. 

Smith, Ernestine Williams Fayetteville 

Smith, Evelyn Rennert 

Smith, Fannie B Kinston 

Smith, Mattie Ruth Scotland Neck 

Smith, Willie Mae Leggett Halifax 

Sparks, Herman Milton Fayetteville 

Sparks, Ola Chandler Fayetteville 

Spearman, Carletta Lumberton 

Spellman, Janie Beatrice Harper.. ..LaGrange 

Spencer, Cornelia T Wadesboro 

Stackhouse, Valeria Fairmont 

Stanford, Ida Spencer Brooklyn, N. Y. 

fStevens, Charles Arthur Wallace 

Stevenson, Beatrice Cowan Cleveland 

Stevenson, Martha B Wadesboro 

Stewart, Thomasina Finch, Charleston, S. C. 
Sturdivant, Mary B Wadesboro 

tSuggs, Sylvester Wesley Hookerton 

Sutton, Mary Lou Clinton 

Swann, Tommie Bell Sanford 

Swett, Lillie Lee Garysburg 

Tate, Patcy Ann Fennell Rose Hill 

Tatum, Bettie T Clinton 

tTaylor, Willie Anthony Wilmington 

Tennessee, Paul Francis Fayetteville 

Terry, Mary Magdlene Wilmington 

Thomas, Evelyn Rockingham 

Thomas, Marie Hawkins Manson 

Thomas, Theo McPhaul Dillon, S. C. 

Thompson, Helen Ruth McDonald 

Tillman, Alma Gould Patrick, S. C. 

Troy, Eloise Clarkton 

Troy, James P Whiteville 

Turner, Ida Mae Gibson 

Vass, Maggie M. Moore Stem 

Vaughn, Lelia Stanley Enfield 

Vick, Alexander Rocky Mount 

tWalker, Dannie Fayetteville 

Walker, Ethel E Norfolk, Va. 

tWalker, James Arthur New Bern 

tWallace, Andrew Allen Fayetteville 

Wallace ( Mary McKoy Maxton 

Ward, Annie Belle Maysville 

Warren, Ruth Taylor Clinton 

Weeks, Minnie Senora Clinton 

Wesbey, Willie J Fayetteville 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



63 



Name Address 

West, Vinella Ashford Clinton 

Whichard, Alice Ruth Washington 

Whitaker, Kathryn Whitakers 

White, Fannie Cooper Fort Bragg 

Winters, Sylvia B Wilmington 

Wilkerson, Lewis A Fayetteville 

Williams, Andrew O'Neal Warsaw 

Williams, Audrey Sykes Goldsboro 

Williams, Cliffornia Mount Olive 



Name Address 

Williams, Georgie Beatrice, Monrovia, Liberia 

Williams, James Arthur Fayetteville 

Williams, Sadie Augusta Wilmington 

f Williams, Walter Fayetteville 

Williams, Whitted Warsaw 

Wimbish, Emma Bell Henderson 

i"Wright, Norman P Fayetteville 

Yelverton, Wilhelmina Goldsboro 



OFF-CAMPUS COLLEGE CENTER 
Wilmington, N. C— 1950-51 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 



fBoynton, William A Wilmington 

Fields, Virginia Wilmington 

Gore, Virginia Supply 

tMoore, George D Wilmington 

fMcFadden, Leroy W Wilmington 



Spearman, Lila M Rose Hill 

Webb, Joseph A Delco 

Webb, Martha Wilmington 

Whitted, Vera L Castle Hayne 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Austin, Denina Smith Wilmington 

Ballard, Joseph E Wilmington 

Brown, Hattie Acme 

tClemmons, William Jewel Wilmington 

Culp, Ruth E Wilmington 

tDunbar, Isadore Wilmington 

Fields, Sadie Cleo Wilmington 

Flowers, Lois Orean Longwood 

tFranks, David Earl Wilmington 

Gause, Willie Wilmington 

Green, Lonnie Delzola Wilmington 

tJackson, Oscar Herbert Wilmington 

Jones, Eva Gore Whiteville 

Lennon, Hazel Wilmington 



tMcAllister. Leroy Wilmington 

tMcGuire, David Castle Hayne 

tPickett, William Wilmington 

Pridgen, Mary Elizabeth Wilmington 

Randall, Mary Ella Wilmington 

Reed, Mallie B Jacksonville 

fRiggins, James Wilmington 

fSimpson, Leon M Wilmington 

Troy, Bernice Perkins Leland 

Waddell, Mary Elizabeth Sanford 

White, Delores Kinston 

tWhite, Marian Davis Wilmington 

fWilson, David E Wilmington 



EXTENSION CENTER 
1950-51 



FORT BRAGG 



Benton, Nathaniel Scottdale, Ga. 

Carter, James E Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Connelly, David Washington, D. C. 

Daniel, Lozell Lawrence Dallas, Texas 

Fields, James Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Johnson, Thomas Jamaica, N. Y. 

Johnson, Willie, Jr Greenville, Miss. 

Keene, Ernest Randolph Baltimore, Md. 

Knight, James Enfield 

Lovett, Dixie Benjamin Augusta, Ga. 

Marshall, Cambrel Bernal McGehee, Ark. 

Means, Lovette P Stanley 

Murriell, Oscar Roger Elizabeth, N. J. 



Owens, Ernest L New York, N. Y. 

Pitt, B. C Pinetops 

Powell, Seldon Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rock, David Alvin Bronx, N. Y. 

Scott, Harvey J Bronx, N. Y. 

Smith, Cleo Herman Jonesboro, Ark. 

Spillman, James B Nacogdoches, Texas 

Taylor, Benjamin Fairfield, Ala. 

Ward, Leon B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Weeks, Rupert Edmond Roxbury, Mass. 

Wilson, Jackie Detroit, Mich. 

Woodall, North E Jackson, Miss. 

Yates, Ronald Joseph Waterford. Conn. 



64 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



T3 
C 
03 
u 

o 


O 

H 


- 


- 


- 


cs 


m 


cs 


^* 


- 


CM 


~ 


- 


o\ 


- 


LO 


+-» 
o 
H 


OJ 

6 

CD 


-« 




- 


- 










O 


- 


•* 








CD 
03 




- 





- 


co 


cn 


"* 


- 


OO 




r^- 


o\ 


- 


>-r> 


01 

CD 

Oh 

CO 


OJ 

£ 


















^O 












u 

0. 




- 












- 


- 








- 




.0 
'3 

CD 
CO 


OJ 

oi 

E 

cd 
fcn 


















CI 

^0 


























m 




CM 

CM 






CM 






O 

'S 

3 


CD 

01 

E 

cd 


















^0 












1) 

03 














PO 




- 




CM 


O 






OJ 



E 



^0 

CO 


OJ 

03 

E 
u 








- 










O 
C7\ 


- 


- 








03 








- 




- 


- 




CM 




■* 






- 


c 

s 

<u 


OJ 
03 

E 
fct. 


- 




- 












OO 
OO 




co 








03 











ro 


- 


1^ 








- 


-* 




•* 


W 

H 
< 
E- 

CO 




03 

E 

03 
JO 
03 

< 


O 

o3 

_o 

O 

U 


.2 
IS 

E 

_3 
O 

u 

O 
+-» 

u 

Q 


03 




03 

"Sb 

(-. 
O 

cd 




CO 

'0 


>> 

-a 


3 

C 

OJ 


"3, 

a 

1 


03 
_C 

"0 

t-i 

O 

4J 

O 


IE 
a 

£ 

03 

EC 

* 

CD 


>> 

CD 
CO 

CD 

1—) 

CD 


u 



>H 

CD 


O 

IE 
O 


.2 

"S 

03 
> 

c 

c 

CD 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



G5 



^* 






-* 




■* 


r^ 






■* 




NO 








On 




PI 


c^i 






O-l 




NO 


*■«■> 


- 




l-O 




ON 








- 




l>« 








- 




LO 


NO 






O 


- 


O 




- 




c-> 




c-> 


CI 






t^- 




no 








r^ 




O) 


r~) 






<M 




ON 


- 






m 




f^ 


O 






ON 




rn 












OJ 


csi 






NO 




On 


• 








CO 




























rt 










CO 
►J 










i-l 


< 


O 








O 


H 


c3 

u 


<u 




01 


o 


_c 


0) 

e 


W 


C 


3 






c 


X 




Q. 






<u 


OJ 








CO 


H 


H 


> 


« 





66 FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT— 1950-1951 

Regular Session Male Female Total 

COLLEGE 

Freshmen f97 f213 f310 

Sophomores 37 97 134 

Juniors 21 66 87 

Seniors 31 80 111 

Special. _ 5 7 12 

Total Regular Session *191 463 *654 

EVENING SCHOOL 1 17 IS 

Total Evening School 1 17 18 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1950: 

First Session _ _ ..__ 76 242 31S 

Total Summer School „ 76 242 318 

TOTAL COLLEGE .._.__ 268 722 990 

EXTRA-MURAL CLASSES: 
Extension 

Fort Bragg 26 26 

Total Extension 26 26 

Wilmington College Center: 

Freshmen 13 14 27 

Sophomores. 4 5 9 

Total Wilmington College Center **17 **19 **36 

TOTAL EXTRA-MURAL CLASSES.... 43 19 62 

TRAINING SCHOOL: 

First Grade 65 58 123 

Second Grade • 60 52 112 

Third Grade 46 52 98 

Fourth Grade 59 42 101 

Fifth Grade 33 47 80 

Sixth Grade 40 30 70 

Seventh Grade 30 43 73 

Eighth Grade 25 23 48 

Total Training School 358 347 705 

GRAND TOTAL 669 1088 1757 

tlncludes new Freshmen — 77 male, 159 female 

"Veterans (Fayetteville) 49 

**Veterans (Wilmington — 13 male, 1 female) 14